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Dating Mammalian Evolution

Fri, 28 Mar 2014 15:14:37 +0000

When the age of the dinosaurs ended around 65 million years ago, mammals stepped in to fill the gap, and the age of the placentals began. However, whether early placental mammals were already present on Earth before the demise of the dinosaurs has been the subject of a long standing debate. Recent research in GEE [...]

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The Delicate Balance of Effect and Response

Tue, 18 Feb 2014 11:50:36 +0000

We may not always be aware of it, but many wild plants, animals, fungi and even bacteria, provide crucial services to us which keep the ecosystems of Earth functioning. Environmental changes caused by human activities are now threatening many species, and those that cannot withstand these changes may be lost forever, potentially taking the services [...]

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It’s All in the Wrist

Fri, 20 Dec 2013 16:18:20 +0000

The evolution of the primate wrist has been dramatic, enabling primates to adapt to a wide variety of lifestyles and walking styles, including tree-swinging, climbing and terrestrial walking both on four legs and two. In hominids, the evolution of the bipedal gait freed up the forelimbs for tool use, and the wrist evolved independently from [...]

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The Transcriptional Profile of A ‘Wingman’

Wed, 27 Nov 2013 14:25:48 +0000

In many species, males have special adaptations to attract females. From antlers to stalk-eyes, to bright plumage and beards, males across the animal kingdom work hard to look attractive to the opposite sex. In some species, looking good isn’t enough, though. Male wild turkeys need a less attractive ‘wingman’ to help him attract a woman. [...]

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Damage and Fidelity: The Role of the Female Germline in mtDNA Inheritance

Mon, 11 Nov 2013 15:13:12 +0000

Billions of years ago, one single-celled organism engulfed another, beginning a symbiotic interaction that would change live on Earth forever. The mitochondria are what remains of this symbiotic event, and are responsible for producing energy in all eukaryotic cells. Derived from a free-living organism, they carry their own genes, but these genes are at risk [...]

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GEE team led by Dr Nik Maniatis makes important progress on way to dissect the genetics of complex inheritance

12 December 2011

A GEE team led by Dr Nik Maniatis [Heather Elding (PhD student), Winston Lau (PostDoc), Prof Dallas Swallow and Nik] have recently made important progress on the way to dissect the genetics of complex inheritance.

Published last week in The American Journal of Human Genetics, the newly identified genes have filled in some of the missing gaps for Crohn’s Disease (CD), as well as showing that different CD patients carry different sets of causal variants. The findings could pave the way for personalised treatment and also lead to improved understanding of how complex diseases are inherited. The team used UK data provided by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Using a powerful mapping technique based on refined genetic maps, they managed to pinpoint the plausible causal locations. All the locations were replicated using independent US data.

Links: 

UCL's Press Release:  “Personalised treatment for Crohn’s Disease a step closer following gene mapping” here

The paper can be found here

Page last modified on 12 dec 11 10:43