A A A

Gee Research Blog

Was Fermentation Key to Yeast Diversification?

Tue, 17 Feb 2015 15:30:43 +0000

From bread to beer, yeast has shaped our diets and our recreation for centuries. Recent research in GEE shows how humans have shaped the evolution of this important microorganism. As well as revealing the evolutionary origins of modern fission yeast, the new study published in Nature Genetics this month shows how techniques developed for detecting […]

The post Was Fermentation Key to Yeast Diversification? appeared first on GEE Research.

Read more...

Planning for the Future – Resilience to Extreme Weather

Thu, 15 Jan 2015 15:13:14 +0000

As climate change progresses, extreme weather events are set to increase in frequency, costing billions and causing immeasurable harm to lives and livelihoods. GEE’s Professor Georgina Mace contributed to the recent Royal Society report on “Resilience to Extreme Weather”, which predicts the future impacts of increasing extreme weather events, and evaluates potential strategies for improving […]

The post Planning for the Future – Resilience to Extreme Weather appeared first on GEE Research.

Read more...

Forecasting Extinction

Mon, 05 Jan 2015 11:33:21 +0000

Classifying a species as either extinct or extant is important if we are to quantify and monitor current rates of biodiversity loss, but it is rare that a biologist is handy to actually observe an extinction event. Finding the last member of a species is difficult, if not impossible, so extinction classifications are usually estimates […]

The post Forecasting Extinction appeared first on GEE Research.

Read more...

Changing Perspectives in Conservation

Thu, 18 Dec 2014 12:15:44 +0000

Our views of the importance of nature and our place within have changed dramatically over the the last century, and the prevailing paradigm has profound influences on conservation from the science that is conducted to the policies that are enacted. In a recent perspectives piece for Science, GEE’s Professor Georgina Mace considered the impacts that […]

The post Changing Perspectives in Conservation appeared first on GEE Research.

Read more...

Function Over Form: Phenotypic Integration and the Evolution of the Mammalian Skull

Mon, 08 Dec 2014 14:05:52 +0000

Our bodies are more than just a collection of independent parts – they are complex, integrated systems that rely upon precise coordination in order to function properly. In order for a leg to function as a leg, the bones, muscles, ligaments, nerves and blood vessels must all work together as an integrated whole. This concept, […]

The post Function Over Form:
Phenotypic Integration and the Evolution of the Mammalian Skull
appeared first on GEE Research.

Read more...

NERC PhD Studentship: Sexual selection, meiotic drive and fertility in stalk-eyed flies

Application Deadline:  10 May 2013

This project integrates field and laboratory based research on sexual selection. Stalk-eyed flies are a canonical example of sexual selection. In Teleopsis dalmanni, males have exaggerated eyespan and females show strong mate preferences for males with larger eyespan. Females have low fertility despite mating at high rates and exhibiting strong mate preference for particular males. Some populations harbour an X-linked meiotic drive system that results in female biased broods due to the degeneration of Y-bearing sperm. This project will further examine the inter-relationships between sexual selection, fertility and meiotic drive. The student will determine the frequency of drive in natural populations at established sites in Malaysia, the role of ecology and demography, and the consequences for the strength of sexual selection. In the laboratory they will exploit SNP and other genomic markers in order to reliably genotype individuals and progeny for meiotic drive, and study the association of meiotic drive with male eyespan and other aspects of male reproductive performance.

The UCL stalk-eyed fly research group is led by Prof. A. Pomiankowski and Prof. K. Fowler and studies multiple facets of the evolution of sexually selected traits. Given the project’s reliance on data collected from natural populations, the attributes of the successful applicant will include independence, initiative and enthusiasm in order to cope with the demands of field research. Note that applicants must have a minimum 2:1 BSc (or equivalent), preferably a Masters level degree, excellent numerate skills (computational and statistical), knowledge of population genetics and bioinformatics. Appropriate training will be provided by UCL. The studentship is funded by NERC and applicants need to satisfy NERC’s UK/EU eligibility requirements. It may be possible to fully fund EU candidates as well.

Applications should be sent as soon as possible, with cover letter, CV & contact details of two referees, to the primary supervisor Professor A. Pomiankowski (email: ucbhpom@ucl.ac.uk)

Closing date: 10th May 2013.

Page last modified on 05 apr 13 12:30