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Festival of Culture Friday 8 June

Morning sessions

The 21st Century PhD | 12:15 - 13:00 | Wilkins Building, South Wing, Garwood lecture theatre

Dr Denise Hawkes, UCL Institute of Education; Aleksandra Griazina, UCL Institute of Education

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The PhD (Doctor of Philosophy) is considered to be the highest academic award in the world. The first PhD was awarded in Paris in the 12th century, but doctoral degrees were not fully established in the UK until the early 20th century. At UCL, PhDs were introduced in 1921, and in 2016-17 there were 5500 research students (14% of the student population). This session will consider the economic and social benefits of obtaining a doctoral degree. We’ll discuss the pros and cons of studying beyond the undergraduate or graduate degree, and share the common misunderstandings and myths relating to doctoral education and its effects. This session is led by academic staff from UCL Institute of Education.


A Refugee Child in WW2 London | 12:30 - 13:30 | Institute of Archaeology, G6 Lecture Theatre

Dr Mereid Puw Davies, UCL School of European Languages, Culture and Society

This event marks the 80th anniversary of the first of the Kindertransports in 1938, in which thousands of refugee children came to Britain from Nazi-occupied Europe, many of them passing through London via Liverpool Street station. We’ll explore one of our century’s greatest novels, W.G. Sebald’s Austerlitz (2001), about a Jewish child who comes to London on a Kindertransport from Prague and recounts his search in later life for his, and Europe’s, lost past. This is a panel event including talks, film screening and discussion with the audience. Speakers are from UCL’s School of European Languages, Culture and Society (SELCS).


Afternoon sessions


Vision and Decision: How We See at Sea | 13:15 - 14:00 | Wilkins Building, South Wing, Garwood lecture theatre

Rico Hodges-Smikle, UCL Arts and Sciences

Every year, hundreds of ships collide with one another at sea. It almost seems like an impossibility, with the oceans being as vast as they are. However, collisions happen and it leads to scores of fatalities and billions in lost cargo every year. A team of students from UCL’s BASc (Liberal Arts) programme, led by Professor Vin Walsh (UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience) and in partnership with CHIRP (the UK’s Confidential Reporting Programme for Aviation and Maritime) delved into how and why these collisions occur. They looked into how the seas affect perception & decision-making by seafarers, and discovered what steps they could make to decrease risk at sea. This involved interviews with crews, repeated crossings between Dover and Calais, and working on one of the world most advanced naval simulators in Europe. 57,000 copies of the students’ report have been ordered for distribution in the maritime industry. Join this session to find out more about this impressive and impactful student project.


REMOTE CONTACT Workshop | 15:00 - 17:00 | Bloomsbury Gallery - 34 BLOOMSBURY STREET, LONDON,WC1B 3QJ

The exhibition takes place all week, opening at 18.00 on 4 June, then daily from 10:00 – 18.00 through to Saturday 9th (inclusive). If you are visiting on Saturday, there is no need to book, please just drop in.

Explore digital touch with us. No specialist knowledge or skills needed. Spaces limited: to book, email Simon Huxtable at s.huxtable@ucl.ac.uk.

REMOTE CONTACT explores how the creative use of technology might enhance feelings of connection and tackle isolation. This is a new exhibition by interactive arts studio Invisible Flock commissioned by IN-TOUCH: Digital Touch Communication, an ERC-funded research project led by Professor Carey Jewitt (UCL Institute of Education). It is funded by Arts Council England and Leeds City Council, and supported by FACT, Community Integrated Care and a Wellcome Trust Arts Award, in collaboration with Professor Nadia Berthouze (UCL Interaction Centre).


Evening sessions


Poetry of Protest and Partition | From 18:00 | Wilkins Building, IAS Common Ground

Dr Pragya Dhital, UCL Institute of Advanced Studies

Be inspired by this performance of revolutionary poetry and song composed during the Indian independence movement and Partition. Songs and poetry by Amrita Pritam and Kazi Nazrul Islam will be performed by Saida Tani and Dave Kukadia. This event marks the joint culmination of two South-Asia themed events taking place during the week at UCL’s Institute of Advanced Studies: the UCL Centre for the Study of South Asia’s graduate student conference, and a symposium, ‘Communism in the Vernacular’, supported by UCL History of Art. The event also reflects increased interest in Communism and South Asia as a result of Marx 200 (the 200th anniversary of the birth of Karl Marx) and the British Council UK/India Year of Culture, 2017-18 (marking the 70th anniversary of Indian independence).


Homerokentra: Female Readings of The Iliad | 18:00 - 19:30 | Darwin Building, B40 lecture theatre

Dr Antony Makrinos, UCL Greek and Latin

The Greek poet Homer (c750-650 BC) is the acknowledged author of the earliest and most influential works of literature in Western culture: The Iliad and The Odyssey. UCL’s annual Summer School in Homer offers five days of intensive teaching of Homeric language and literature. 2017’s Summer School produced a film which celebrated the universality of Homer’s epics through the reading of selected Homeric passages by 14 women. The film, Homerokentra: Female Voices Reading the Iliad, demonstrates how diverse female readings of the Iliad contribute to student and public engagement with Homer. Discover how the film was made, and hear about how it has influenced the teaching and reception of Homer in the classroom. Dr Antony Makrinos is a Senior Teaching Fellow in the Department of Greek and Latin at UCL. The Department is a registered member and award holder of the Athena SWAN Charter, which recognises advancement of gender equality initiatives in higher education.


Hide and Seek: A Queer Tour of Bloomsbury | 18:00 onwards | Meet in Main Quad, UCL

Professor Robert Mills, Director of qUCL

Join us for an evening saunter through the streets of Bloomsbury. From writers and artists to cruisers and boozers, this event will throw light on the peoples and places that have contributed to the area's queer histories. Beginning with an opening drinks reception and informal talk at UCL, participants will be encouraged to form impromptu groups, issued with route maps, and set off on a whistle-stop tour of the neighbourhood’s diverse LGBTQ+ heritage. Volunteer pop-up ‘guides’ will be on hand to recount stories connected with specific locations along the way. Talk at 6.30pm. Tours from 6.45pm. End around 8pm. Estimated walking distance 1.6 miles. This event is sponsored by qUCL, an academic network which brings together UCL staff and students with research and teaching interests in LGBTQ studies, gender and sexuality studies, queer theory and related fields.


A Musical Romance: Proust and Hahn | 19:00 - 20:00 | Wilkins Building, Haldane Room

Dr Jennifer Rushworth, UCL School of European Languages, Culture and Society 

This session will explore the relationship between the French writer Marcel Proust (1871–1922) and the Venezuelan composer Reynaldo Hahn (1874–1947). It will be illustrated by extracts from letters between the two, and performances of some of Hahn’s songs. The session will be led by Dr Jennifer Rushworth (UCL French) and relates to her ongoing research into Proust and music, featured in BBC Radio 3’s ‘In Search of Proust’s Music’ in autumn 2017. Join us for an insight into the artistic collaboration between Proust and Hahn, and explore how their relationship developed from the 1890s until Proust’s death from pneumonia in 1922.


All Day Sessions 

The Prague Spring Through the Lens of Frank Carter | 09:00-21:00 | UCL SSEES Building, 4th Floor, 16 Taviton Street, WC1H 0BW

Mgr. Zuzana Pinčíková, UCL School of Slavonic and Eastern European Studies Library

Displaying items from UCL SSEES Library Special Collections, the exhibition depicts the resilience and bravery of ordinary Czechs and Slovaks during the era of political liberalization in 1968. The geographer Frank Carter captured the turbulent times of the former republic of the Eastern Bloc during his research trip to Prague. At that time, on the night of 20 - 21 August, thousands of Warsaw Pact troops and tanks invaded Czechoslovakia to halt pro-liberalization reforms. To mark the 50th anniversary of the Prague Spring as well as the European Year of Cultural Heritage, Frank Carter's collection will be digitised and made available in the UCL Digital Collections repository. The exhibition is curated by UCL SSEES Library in partnership with the UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies, and it is realised with support from Professor Frank Carter Postgraduate Prize Fund.

Professor Frank Carter was a historical geographer who held a joint appointment in the UCL Department of Geography and at SSEES from 1966 to 1990. In 1990 he moved full-time to SSEES and died in service in 2001, having been awarded a personal chair. Fluent in all the main East European languages, he also possessed an extraordinary talent to perceive the country he was studying from the inside; he was Bulgarian in Bulgaria, Polish in Poland, and Greek in Greece. His contribution to UCL is commemorated by the annual Frank Carter memorial lecture and by two annual prizes for graduate students in the UCL Department of Geography and the UCL SSEES.


Slade Graduate Degree Shows | Slade School of Fine Art, North Wing, Gower Street, UCL | Runs from 7 - 17 June

Open 10:00 - 20:00 weekdays and 10:00 - 17:00 weekends

Come and take a look at the impressive pieces of fine art produced by this year's Graduate students of the Slade. No booking is required - drop in during the hours open.


REMOTE CONTACT | Bloomsbury Gallery - 34 BLOOMSBURY STREET, LONDON,WC1B 3QJ

The exhibition takes place all week, opening at 18.00 on 4 June, then daily from 10:00 – 18.00 through to Saturday 9th (inclusive). If you are visiting on Saturday, there is no need to book, please just drop in.

Professor Carey Jewitt (UCL Institute of Education)

REMOTE CONTACT explores how the creative use of technology might enhance feelings of connection and tackle isolation. This is a new exhibition by interactive arts studio Invisible Flock commissioned by IN-TOUCH: Digital Touch Communication, an ERC-funded research project led by Professor Carey Jewitt (UCL Institute of Education). It is funded by Arts Council England and Leeds City Council, and supported by FACT, Community Integrated Care and a Wellcome Trust Arts Award, in collaboration with Professor Nadia Berthouze (UCL Interaction Centre).


Monday 4 June

Tuesday 5 June

Wednesday 6 June

Thursday 7 June