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COMMENTS 

How come “intolerant” Poland is among European leaders in collecting data on hate crimes?

In Poland over the past ten years, there has been a creeping recognition of the need to combat hate crime. While intolerance remains an issue in this Central European country, developments in in the official response to targeted violence are evident. Nevertheless, it is unclear what motivated the authorities to address this issue. Piotr Godzisz, PhD candidate at UCL SSEES, explores what explains Poland’s leadership in this regard.
14 January 2016
Piotr Godzisz More...

Starts: Jan 14, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Maps in Films: the View from Ealing

In the website The Cine-Tourist, Roland-François Lack, Senior Lecturer in UCL’s Department of French, has created a repository for his research around cinema and place. Here he illustrates some connections between maps and films.
1 February 2016
Roland-François Lack More...

Starts: Feb 4, 2016 12:00:00 AM

How ISIS Rule and Mobilisation Matters for the Military Response to the Paris Attacks

Kristin Bakke, Senior Lecturer in Political Science looks at how air strikes may affect ISIS, given how ISIS rules and how it mobilises support and recruits fighters. Although air strikes might contribute to containing the group and its ability to rule, it is likely to fuel the narrative that fosters mobilisation. To the degree that there is a case for a military response against ISIS, it is, by itself, insufficient. More...

Starts: Dec 16, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Ukraine's election turning point?

11 June 2014

25 May 2014
Dr Andrew Wilson (UCL SSSEES) explains why Ukraine's early presidential election may prove a turning point for the troubled country.


A few weeks ago, there were real doubts that Ukraine's election would even go ahead. But in Kiev at least, where I was until Monday, the optimists are beginning to think they will not only be held, but will prove to be the turning point in the crisis.

But first, what are the key things to look for on Sunday?

The first important question is how many are able and willing to vote. Notwithstanding Thursday's deadly attacks in Donetsk, the authorities in Kiev think they have contained the crisis in the east and even hope to conduct the voting in the parts of the separatist Donbass region that they control, which are currently the south and west of Donetsk and the north of Luhansk.

Crimea, on the other hand, looks like a lost cause, in voting terms at least, though the authorities will offer voting facilities just across the "border" in Kherson.

If enough voters turn out elsewhere in the east and south, and national turnout is something around 60%, this would a big victory for the authorities in Kiev.

The second criterion for success is that Russia does not use criticism of the process to increase its intervention once more. Complaints of fraud from any of the losing candidates would only play into Russia's hands.


Read in full: BBC News >>