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COMMENTS 

Brexit and empire: a long-term view

Can a long-term and comparative understanding of the nature of imperial identities shed light on some of the dynamics behind Brexit? The ways in which empires – and their collapse – transform their central regions as much as the colonies constitute a significant part of the story, argues Andrew Gardner, summarising an article recently published in the Journal of Social Archaeology.
Andrew Gardner (Institute of Archaeology)
20 February 2017
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Starts: Feb 20, 2017 12:00:00 AM

The government's Brexit white paper: a missed opportunity

Nicholas Wright from the UCL School of Public Policy analyses the government's recent White Paper on Brexit.
Nicholas Wright (SPP)
17 February 2017
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Starts: Feb 17, 2017 12:00:00 AM

The process of Brexit: What comes next?

In a new report published jointly by the UCL Constitution Unit and the UCL European Institute, Alan Renwick,  Deputy Director of the Constitution Unit, examines what the process of Brexit is likely to look like over the coming weeks, months, and years. Here he summarises five key lessons.
Alan Renwick (Constitution Unit)
8 February 2017
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Starts: Feb 1, 2017 12:00:00 AM

Ukraine conflict: the regime will finish what it started

19 February 2014

19 February 2014
Miscalculation from both sides led to a spectacular escalation into violence, but returning from the brink is now unlikely.
Dr Andrew Wilson, SSEES


Things are pretty frightening in Kiev, where I am an accidental witness to this week's spectacular descent into violence. All sides in Ukraine have miscalculated, but they are not all equally guilty. The moderate opposition parties in parliament, led by the boxer Vitali Klitschko, did not consult fully with the Maidan Square protesters when they were negotiating possible compromise over the weekend.

A big group of protesters therefore left Kiev's central square, which is the protesters' last redoubt, to march on parliament to show they still counted. But the chair of parliament refused to allow discussion of any of the key motions on a new government or on giving that government real power by changing the constitution.

Read: The Guardian >>