Welcome to the UCL European Institute, UCL's hub for research, collaboration and information on Europe and the European Union. We are part of the Institute of Advanced Studies.


Contact us

16 Taviton St
London
WC1H 0BW
+44 (0) 207 679 8737
european.institute@ucl.ac.uk

How to find us >>

trans32.pngtrans32.pngtrans32.pngtrans32.png

COMMENTS 

What the people of Nagorno-Karabakh think about the future of their homeland

The disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakah has been caught in a tug-of-war between Armenia and Azerbaijan for decades. Internationally recognised as part of Azerbaijan, it’s home to an estimated 120,000 people, primarily ethnic Armenians, who want to separate from Azerbaijan. It’s been a de facto independent state since a fragile ceasefire was brokered in 1994, and low-level violence has flared up every spring ever since.
3 May 2016
Kristin M. Bakke
More...

Starts: May 3, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Migration, the lightning rod of the EU referendum

The EU-Turkey deal should have no role in the Brexit debate, yet it brings the crucial question of the European Union and migration into focus at an inopportune time.
14 April 2016
Uta Staiger
More...

Starts: Apr 14, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Unsettling times for a settled population? Polish perspectives on Brexit

Many Poles have lived, worked, and settled in the UK for up to 12 years now. Anne White, Professor of Polish Studies at the UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies, says it’s no longer so easy for them to pick up and leave.
14 April 2016
Anne White
More...

Starts: Apr 14, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Ukraine conflict: the regime will finish what it started

19 February 2014

19 February 2014
Miscalculation from both sides led to a spectacular escalation into violence, but returning from the brink is now unlikely.
Dr Andrew Wilson, SSEES


Things are pretty frightening in Kiev, where I am an accidental witness to this week's spectacular descent into violence. All sides in Ukraine have miscalculated, but they are not all equally guilty. The moderate opposition parties in parliament, led by the boxer Vitali Klitschko, did not consult fully with the Maidan Square protesters when they were negotiating possible compromise over the weekend.

A big group of protesters therefore left Kiev's central square, which is the protesters' last redoubt, to march on parliament to show they still counted. But the chair of parliament refused to allow discussion of any of the key motions on a new government or on giving that government real power by changing the constitution.

Read: The Guardian >>