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Do Not Fear Austerity: A Public Meeting with Yanis Varoufakis

Alessandro de Arcangelis, UCL PhD student in History, reports on a ‘public meeting’ with Yanis Varoufakis, and his advice to Jeremy Corbyn.
30 September 2015
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Starts: Oct 1, 2015 12:00:00 AM

A Syrian tragedy turning into a European tragedy

Gëzim Krasniqi, Fellow at UCL’s School of Slavonic and East European Studies, traces the shifting routes chosen by refugees from Syria—and how the EU’s lack of a coordinated policy has been turning the Syrian tragedy into a European one. It has left the Balkan states with a refugee crisis impossible to master.
23 September 2015
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Starts: Sep 23, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Fathers, Sons, and Grandfathers: Migration Across Generations

Through the stories of three generations in thirty families, Julia Brannen explores men's lives, migration, employment, fatherhood, father-son relationships and intergenerational transmission over the life course. As the worst refugee crisis since the Second World War unfolds across continents, she traces the stories of migrant generations that have gone before, of Irish grandfathers who left Ireland in the mid-20th century and Polish fathers who came to Britain in the 21st century, together with a group of white British 
9 September 2015
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Starts: Sep 9, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Portugal's Golden Mystery

11 June 2014

28 May 2014
Professor Neill Lochery (UCL Hebrew & Jewish Studies) discusses the use of Nazi gold in World War II to buy wolfram, a rare ore from Portugal.

In the hugely entertaining book and movie, "The Monuments Men," a dedicated team fights to save the rare art treasures that the Nazis had stolen during the occupation of Europe in World War II. The location and ownership of much of the looted art still remains unknown. Worryingly, international art authorities increasingly believe that once the World War II generation dies, claims made against individual collectors, galleries and museums will all be forgotten.

In other words, the trail will end soon. And no doubt, the beneficiaries of the looting hope this is just what will happen.

This dynamic is mirrored in another unsolved mystery of World War II, in the trail of the so-called "Nazi gold." The Germans stole the gold from countries they had occupied and, later in the war, from the victims of the Holocaust.

Having spent the past five years researching the trail of the gold in archives across the globe, the results I have discovered in declassified files are revelatory and worrying.

Read in full: Wall Street Journal >>