Welcome to the UCL European Institute, UCL's hub for research, collaboration and information on Europe and the European Union. We are part of the Institute of Advanced Studies.


Contact us

16 Taviton St
London
WC1H 0BW
+44 (0) 207 679 8737
european.institute@ucl.ac.uk

How to find us >>

trans32.pngtrans32.pngtrans32.pngtrans32.png

COMMENTS 

Migration, the lightning rod of the EU referendum

The EU-Turkey deal should have no role in the Brexit debate, yet it brings the crucial question of the European Union and migration into focus at an inopportune time.
14 April 2016
Uta Staiger
More...

Starts: Apr 14, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Unsettling times for a settled population? Polish perspectives on Brexit

Many Poles have lived, worked, and settled in the UK for up to 12 years now. Anne White, Professor of Polish Studies at the UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies, says it’s no longer so easy for them to pick up and leave.
14 April 2016
Anne White
More...

Starts: Apr 14, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Some thoughts on the psycho-geography of Europe’s free movement

Eastern European migration takes place in a very different context than it once did. Eva Hoffman, author and essayist, asks what drives people to leave, and what drives them back again? This piece is part of the UCL European Institute’s commissioning partnership with openDemocracy.
7 April 2016
Eva Hoffman
More...

Starts: Apr 7, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Portugal's Golden Mystery

11 June 2014

28 May 2014
Professor Neill Lochery (UCL Hebrew & Jewish Studies) discusses the use of Nazi gold in World War II to buy wolfram, a rare ore from Portugal.


In the hugely entertaining book and movie, "The Monuments Men," a dedicated team fights to save the rare art treasures that the Nazis had stolen during the occupation of Europe in World War II. The location and ownership of much of the looted art still remains unknown. Worryingly, international art authorities increasingly believe that once the World War II generation dies, claims made against individual collectors, galleries and museums will all be forgotten.

In other words, the trail will end soon. And no doubt, the beneficiaries of the looting hope this is just what will happen.

This dynamic is mirrored in another unsolved mystery of World War II, in the trail of the so-called "Nazi gold." The Germans stole the gold from countries they had occupied and, later in the war, from the victims of the Holocaust.

Having spent the past five years researching the trail of the gold in archives across the globe, the results I have discovered in declassified files are revelatory and worrying.


Read in full: Wall Street Journal >>