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COMMENTS 

Defining a new political contract for the EU

The EU is faced with the challenges of fashioning practices and institutions that reconcile the conflicting demands on political representatives from their international partners and their domestic constituents. This has been particularly manifest in the eurozone recently, but it reflects a deeper challenge which also concerns non euro-area members such as the UK.
Prof Albert Weale (UCL SPP)
19 March 2015 More...

Starts: Mar 19, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Don’t let the Paris murderers win

Professor Laborde warns against the reactivist response to the Paris murders: they misunderstand the role played by free speech and by laïcité. Further, they allow criminals to set the term of the debate on how to better facilitate Muslim integration if France.
Professor Cécile Laborde
26 February 2015 More...

Starts: Feb 26, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Britain and EU reform

Piet Eeckhout revisits the question of EU reform, including different options for and legal as well as political constraints of such reform.
Professor Piet Eeckhout
20 January 2015 More...

Starts: Jan 20, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Portugal's Golden Mystery

11 June 2014

28 May 2014
Professor Neill Lochery (UCL Hebrew & Jewish Studies) discusses the use of Nazi gold in World War II to buy wolfram, a rare ore from Portugal.


In the hugely entertaining book and movie, "The Monuments Men," a dedicated team fights to save the rare art treasures that the Nazis had stolen during the occupation of Europe in World War II. The location and ownership of much of the looted art still remains unknown. Worryingly, international art authorities increasingly believe that once the World War II generation dies, claims made against individual collectors, galleries and museums will all be forgotten.

In other words, the trail will end soon. And no doubt, the beneficiaries of the looting hope this is just what will happen.

This dynamic is mirrored in another unsolved mystery of World War II, in the trail of the so-called "Nazi gold." The Germans stole the gold from countries they had occupied and, later in the war, from the victims of the Holocaust.

Having spent the past five years researching the trail of the gold in archives across the globe, the results I have discovered in declassified files are revelatory and worrying.


Read in full: Wall Street Journal >>