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Why we post: a global perspective on social media

How do people use social media in different parts of the world, and what are the implications? Professor Daniel Miller explains what a team of anthropologists found by sending 15 months each in nine small towns all over the world, comparing social media use. You can engage with their research through a variety of free online resources including UCL’s first massive open online course (MOOC) starting on 29th February, a series of open access books published by UCL Press, and a short video.
25 November 2015
Daniel Miller  More...

Starts: Nov 25, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Cameron - Banning Milk and Cheese

Pablo Echenique is one of the five Podemos members elected to the European Parliament in 2014, and currently running for parliament in the upcoming Spanish general election. On Monday 26 October, he was scheduled to talk at the UCL European Institute, however the event had to be cancelled when he ran into difficulties at the UK Border. Here, he explains the full story…
2 November 2015
Pablo Echenique

Starts: Nov 1, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Flights from Freedom

Eva Hoffman, former editor of The New York Times and Visiting Professor at the UCL European Institute, asks what propels individuals to turn to extremist movements and argues that we need to build a ‘culture of democracy’ with shared norms and ethics.
22 October 2015
Eva Hoffman More...

Starts: Oct 22, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Portugal's Golden Mystery

11 June 2014

28 May 2014
Professor Neill Lochery (UCL Hebrew & Jewish Studies) discusses the use of Nazi gold in World War II to buy wolfram, a rare ore from Portugal.

In the hugely entertaining book and movie, "The Monuments Men," a dedicated team fights to save the rare art treasures that the Nazis had stolen during the occupation of Europe in World War II. The location and ownership of much of the looted art still remains unknown. Worryingly, international art authorities increasingly believe that once the World War II generation dies, claims made against individual collectors, galleries and museums will all be forgotten.

In other words, the trail will end soon. And no doubt, the beneficiaries of the looting hope this is just what will happen.

This dynamic is mirrored in another unsolved mystery of World War II, in the trail of the so-called "Nazi gold." The Germans stole the gold from countries they had occupied and, later in the war, from the victims of the Holocaust.

Having spent the past five years researching the trail of the gold in archives across the globe, the results I have discovered in declassified files are revelatory and worrying.

Read in full: Wall Street Journal >>