Welcome to the UCL European Institute, UCL's hub for research, collaboration and information on Europe and the European Union.

Contact us

16 Taviton St
London
WC1H 0BW
+44 (0) 207 679 8737
european.institute@ucl.ac.uk

How to find us >>

trans32.pngtrans32.pngtrans32.pngtrans32.png

COMMENTS 

"A bad day for Europe"?

Juncker’s nomination was not a sudden, not an unexpected and not even a distinct event. Neither does it spell an end to the European Council’s dominance in constitutional politics or make EU reform less likely.
Dr Christine Reh
2 July 2014
More...

Starts: Jul 1, 2014 12:00:00 AM

When anger masks apathy

As a closer look at the European Parliament Elections in Central and Eastern Europe suggests, it may be non-voting, rather than populist protest voting, which could prove the real long-term threat to sustainability of the EU’s troubled democratic institutions.
Dr Sean Hanley
2 June 2014 More...

Starts: Jun 2, 2014 12:00:00 AM

The Eighth European Parliament: More Politicisation

Despite “shocks” & “earthquakes” that took place at the national level, the European Parliament remains mainly pro-EU. Why did the rise of Eurosceptics not make more of an impact, and what do the results mean for the 8th European Parliament?
Alexander Katsaitis
27 May 2014 More...

Starts: May 27, 2014 12:00:00 AM

Portugal's Golden Mystery

11 June 2014

28 May 2014
Professor Neill Lochery (UCL Hebrew & Jewish Studies) discusses the use of Nazi gold in World War II to buy wolfram, a rare ore from Portugal.


In the hugely entertaining book and movie, "The Monuments Men," a dedicated team fights to save the rare art treasures that the Nazis had stolen during the occupation of Europe in World War II. The location and ownership of much of the looted art still remains unknown. Worryingly, international art authorities increasingly believe that once the World War II generation dies, claims made against individual collectors, galleries and museums will all be forgotten.

In other words, the trail will end soon. And no doubt, the beneficiaries of the looting hope this is just what will happen.

This dynamic is mirrored in another unsolved mystery of World War II, in the trail of the so-called "Nazi gold." The Germans stole the gold from countries they had occupied and, later in the war, from the victims of the Holocaust.

Having spent the past five years researching the trail of the gold in archives across the globe, the results I have discovered in declassified files are revelatory and worrying.


Read in full: Wall Street Journal >>