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COMMENTS 

YES, for our Dignity

4 July 2015
In this post, Kalypso Nicolaïdis, Professor of International Relations at Oxford, and Othon Anastasakis, Director of the European Studies Centre, St Antony’s College Oxford, explain how a ‘yes’ vote in tomorrow’s Greek referendum is a choice for dignity rather than fear, as canvassed by the No campaign.
Prof. Kalypso Nicolaïdis 
Dr. Othon Anastasakis More...

Starts: Jul 4, 2015 12:00:00 AM

What precisely is the Greek government’s mandate?

Kira Gartzou, research assistant in European Studies, analyses the differences in views expressed by Syriza towards Europe, and in particular Germany, during its winning electoral campaign, and the views now portrayed in Syriza’s party newspaper since coming to power in January 2015. What implications may this have for the future of Greek negotiations with creditor institutions, and what is actually the mandate of the Greek government?
Dr. Kira Gartzou
25 June 2015 More...

Starts: Jun 25, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Extremism disenchanted: what role can education play?

Young people in the UK today who are attracted to extremism are typically well educated. Given the weaknesses of this ideology in terms of its use of history, internal coherence of arguments and moral standards, its success with many educated young people requires explanation. The explanation, according to Dr. Farid, is multifaceted but education has a big role to play in curbing the trend.
2 June 2015
Dr. Farid Panjwani More...

Starts: Jun 2, 2015 12:00:00 AM

How can we end the male domination of philosophy?

28 November 2013

26 November 2013
There is still an 'aristocracy of sex' in the world of philosophy where women find it hard to thrive, says Jonathan Wolff (Professor of Philosophy and Dean of Arts and Humanities, UCL).


In 1863, John Stuart Mill wrote: "The entire history of social improvement has been a series of transitions, by which one custom or institution after another, from being a supposed primary necessity of social existence, has passed into the rank of a universally stigmatised injustice and tyranny. So it has been with the distinctions of slaves and freemen, nobles and serfs, patricians and plebeians; and so it will be, and in part already is, with the aristocracies of colour, race, and sex."

Mill's remarks came back to me recently when I was glancing again through philosopher Mary Warnock's memoirs, first published in 2000. In philosophy there has been much attention to how much work we still have to do to overcome the "aristocracy of sex", both in terms of job advancement and attitudes. A blog, What Is It Like to Be A Woman in Philosophy?, records tales of everyday sexism: points made by women in meetings being ignored until repeated by a man; a room full of men falling silent when a woman walks through the door; clumsy sexual advances that when rebuffed generate a hostile atmosphere. Unlikely that philosophy, or indeed academia, is alone here, but we are under the spotlight at the moment because of a high-profile resignation over a sexual harassment complaint at the University of Miami that has been widely discussed.

What was it like for Mary Warnock and her friends in the Oxford of the 1940s?

Read the full article in The Guardian >>