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Why we post: a global perspective on social media

How do people use social media in different parts of the world, and what are the implications? Professor Daniel Miller explains what a team of anthropologists found by sending 15 months each in nine small towns all over the world, comparing social media use. You can engage with their research through a variety of free online resources including UCL’s first massive open online course (MOOC) starting on 29th February, a series of open access books published by UCL Press, and a short video.
25 November 2015
Daniel Miller  More...

Starts: Nov 25, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Cameron - Banning Milk and Cheese

Pablo Echenique is one of the five Podemos members elected to the European Parliament in 2014, and currently running for parliament in the upcoming Spanish general election. On Monday 26 October, he was scheduled to talk at the UCL European Institute, however the event had to be cancelled when he ran into difficulties at the UK Border. Here, he explains the full story…
2 November 2015
Pablo Echenique

Starts: Nov 1, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Flights from Freedom

Eva Hoffman, former editor of The New York Times and Visiting Professor at the UCL European Institute, asks what propels individuals to turn to extremist movements and argues that we need to build a ‘culture of democracy’ with shared norms and ethics.
22 October 2015
Eva Hoffman More...

Starts: Oct 22, 2015 12:00:00 AM

How can we end the male domination of philosophy?

28 November 2013

26 November 2013
There is still an 'aristocracy of sex' in the world of philosophy where women find it hard to thrive, says Jonathan Wolff (Professor of Philosophy and Dean of Arts and Humanities, UCL).

In 1863, John Stuart Mill wrote: "The entire history of social improvement has been a series of transitions, by which one custom or institution after another, from being a supposed primary necessity of social existence, has passed into the rank of a universally stigmatised injustice and tyranny. So it has been with the distinctions of slaves and freemen, nobles and serfs, patricians and plebeians; and so it will be, and in part already is, with the aristocracies of colour, race, and sex."

Mill's remarks came back to me recently when I was glancing again through philosopher Mary Warnock's memoirs, first published in 2000. In philosophy there has been much attention to how much work we still have to do to overcome the "aristocracy of sex", both in terms of job advancement and attitudes. A blog, What Is It Like to Be A Woman in Philosophy?, records tales of everyday sexism: points made by women in meetings being ignored until repeated by a man; a room full of men falling silent when a woman walks through the door; clumsy sexual advances that when rebuffed generate a hostile atmosphere. Unlikely that philosophy, or indeed academia, is alone here, but we are under the spotlight at the moment because of a high-profile resignation over a sexual harassment complaint at the University of Miami that has been widely discussed.

What was it like for Mary Warnock and her friends in the Oxford of the 1940s?

Read the full article in The Guardian >>