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COMMENTS 

How come “intolerant” Poland is among European leaders in collecting data on hate crimes?

In Poland over the past ten years, there has been a creeping recognition of the need to combat hate crime. While intolerance remains an issue in this Central European country, developments in in the official response to targeted violence are evident. Nevertheless, it is unclear what motivated the authorities to address this issue. Piotr Godzisz, PhD candidate at UCL SSEES, explores what explains Poland’s leadership in this regard.
14 January 2016
Piotr Godzisz More...

Starts: Jan 14, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Maps in Films: the View from Ealing

In the website The Cine-Tourist, Roland-François Lack, Senior Lecturer in UCL’s Department of French, has created a repository for his research around cinema and place. Here he illustrates some connections between maps and films.
1 February 2016
Roland-François Lack More...

Starts: Feb 4, 2016 12:00:00 AM

How ISIS Rule and Mobilisation Matters for the Military Response to the Paris Attacks

Kristin Bakke, Senior Lecturer in Political Science looks at how air strikes may affect ISIS, given how ISIS rules and how it mobilises support and recruits fighters. Although air strikes might contribute to containing the group and its ability to rule, it is likely to fuel the narrative that fosters mobilisation. To the degree that there is a case for a military response against ISIS, it is, by itself, insufficient. More...

Starts: Dec 16, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Tatar Sunni Muslims pose a threat to Russia's occupation of Crimea

17 March 2014

5 March 2014
Pro-Ukrainian Islamic minority could mount a more organised resistance against Russian forces in Crimea peninsula.
Dr Andrew Wilson, SSEES


Russia may be tightening its grip on Crimea, with little resistance to date, but they have yet to face the Crimean Tatar factor.

There are 266,000 Crimean Tatars in Crimea, over 13% of the local population. They are Sunni Muslim, traditionally pro-Ukrainian, and much better organised than the local Ukrainians, who make up 23% of the population.

A quick look at history tells you why: Stalin deported the Crimean Tatars en masse to Central Asia in 1944, and half of them died during or after the journey. They were only able to return after 1989; by which time their homes had gone and their culture had been erased.

Read The Guardian >>