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COMMENTS 

Brexit in the Supreme Court: Your Questions Answered

The Supreme Court will be the centre of political attention this week when the government’s appeal of last month’s High Court ruling on the triggering of Article 50 is heard. Robert Hazell and Harmish Mehta offer an overview of what the case is about, the likely outcome and its implications for the Brexit timetable.
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Starts: Dec 5, 2016 12:00:00 AM

The Constitution of Democracy

Albert Weale argues that the Article 50 case did not represent the judges against the people, as some newspaper headlines suggested, but the judges for the people. More...

Starts: Nov 18, 2016 12:00:00 AM

The Brexit Brokers

Meet the people who will deal the cards that could seal Britain's fate - on Europe's behalf.
Uta Staiger and Nicholas Wright (UCL)
18 November 2016
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Starts: Nov 18, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Black scholars still experience racism on campus

31 March 2014

20 March 2014
At a UCL talk titled “Why isn’t my professor black?”, academics argued that universities are beset by a racist mindset that views black people as “outsiders”


Universities are beset by a racist mindset that views black people as “outsiders”, academics have argued.

At a public talk titled “Why Isn’t My Professor Black?” at University College London, a number of black scholars claimed that insidious forms of racism may explain why just 85 of the UK’s 18,500 professors are black, and only 17 are black women.

William Ackah, lecturer in community and voluntary sector studies at Birkbeck, University of London, told the event, which was chaired by UCL provost and president Michael Arthur, that outdated Victorian views on the “wild and untamed” nature of “the Negro” still persisted at some level in UK universities.

Read the Times Higher Education >>