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COMMENTS 

An interview with the President of the European Court of Human Rights

Dean Spielmann, President of the European Court of Human Rights since September 2012, has served as a Judge in the Court for over a decade. In a recent interview with the UCL Law Society’s Silk v. Brief, highlights of which are condensed in the blog post below, he discusses the evolving role of human rights in Europe, and explores the complicated relationship between the UK and the European Convention on Human Rights.
Dean Spielmann
23 March 2015 More...

Starts: Mar 23, 2015 12:00:00 AM

In Defence of Rights

Philippe Sands, Professor of Law at UCL and practising barrister in international law, and Helena Kennedy, a leading barrister and academic in human rights law, civil liberties and constitutional issues, were members of the 2011 Commission on a Bill of Rights. In highlights from a recent article in the London Review of Books, they discuss how human rights intersect with politics, examine the UK’s strained relationship with the European Convention on Human Rights, and question the possible motivations lying behind the proposed Bill.
Prof. Philippe Sands 
Helena Kennedy
1 April 2015 More...

Starts: Apr 1, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Exploring ‘Exploratory Governance': the Hertie Governance Report 2015

With the Eurozone crisis not yet over, Albert Weale, Professor of Political Theory and Public Policy at UCL, reviews the Hertie Governance Report 2015 as it analyses the key issues facing the European Institutions in terms of economic governance. As ad hoc solutions are found to deal with urgent matters, what does this mean for political accountability and reform in the EU, and what lessons have been learnt?
Prof. Albert Weale
14 April 2015 More...

Starts: Apr 14, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Call for Papers: Forced Migration - Global Perspectives & Practices

19 March 2013

Student Conference, 12th June 2013, University College London (UCL).

As we turn further into the twenty-first century, our ways of making sense of the world are becoming increasingly compromised. Shifting causes and patterns of human movement are encouraging a reassessment of perspectives and practices towards migration. In terms of forced migration studies, factors such as climate change, food security and the economic crisis, as well as the continuation of existing pressures, like protracted refugee situations and internal displacement, have dramatically altered the field. If people are not forced by the violent or persecutory actions of others to seek protection but feel compelled to leave their home due to natural disasters or poverty, to what extent can they be considered forced migrants?

In the face of this changing context, there is a clear importance in widening our analytical vision beyond Western Europe, fostering a global perspective in order to develop new practices and policies on a global, regional and local scale. Are we now starting to push the boundaries and interpretation of terminologies? Is it time for a whole new theoretical and practical vocabulary to take migration studies into the future?

‘Forced Migration: Global Perspectives and Practices’ is a student conference organised in collaboration with the Migration Research Unit at UCL in order to encourage students from different disciplines to share their current research in this area. This conference seeks perspectives from across the world, including current and historical approaches, on issues and experiences in relation to forced migration. The event aims to provide a forum for an exchange of ideas and knowledge between students working on these issues.

We invite all postgraduate students (Masters and PhD level) to submit short abstracts (500 words) of their research by the 15th April 2013 to mrustudentconference@gmail.com. Presentations during the conference will be roughly 20 minutes for each speaker. We encourage students from any academic discipline to contribute, and papers with an interdisciplinary perspective are especially welcome.

Suggested themes include (but are not limited to):

  • Accountability, Rights and Responsibility: State, Society and the Individual
  • Agency and Victimhood
  • Integration, Citizenship and Belonging
  • Blurring of Borders and Boundaries: Concepts, Terminologies and Forms of Movement
  • Protracted Refugee Situations, Refugee Camps and Durable Solutions
  • International Protection, Regional Responses and Local Policy
  • Overcoming Barriers: Advocacy, Activism and Civil and Political Rights
  • Social and Economic Rights of Forced Migrants

Find us on Facebook: ‘MRU Student Conference’
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Please note that speakers will be expected to contribute £5 towards the cost of the conference.

We also encourage postgraduate students who do not wish to present the paper to attend the conference. If you are interested in attending please email: mrustudentconference@gmail.com