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COMMENTS 

At the Edges of Europe: Britain, Romania and European Identities

In their relationship to Europe, both Britain and Romania are situated at the continent’s edge, but that is where any list of comparisons between the two countries usually ends. Certainly, both countries are members of the European Union, but their respective responses to the European Union differ markedly. Polls conducted by Eurobarometer consistently put Romanians among the most enthusiastic supporters of the European Union, and the British (along with the Greeks) among the least. But what are the historical roots of Romanian and British attitudes towards Europe and the European idea?
27 July 2015
Prof. Martyn Rady More...

Starts: Jul 27, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Extremism disenchanted: what role can education play?

Young people in the UK today who are attracted to extremism are typically well educated. Given the weaknesses of this ideology in terms of its use of history, internal coherence of arguments and moral standards, its success with many educated young people requires explanation. The explanation, according to Dr. Farid, is multifaceted but education has a big role to play in curbing the trend.
2 June 2015
Dr. Farid Panjwani More...

Starts: Jun 2, 2015 12:00:00 AM

The case for an EU referendum

Christopher Bickerton, lecturer in Politics at the University of Cambridge, discusses how how the impending EU referendum in the UK necessitates open and unbiased academic debate, and how British discussions of EU reform may reverberate across the European continent.
15 May 2015
Dr. Christopher Bickerton More...

Starts: May 15, 2015 12:00:00 AM

UCL academics in the media: the European Court of Human Rights

25 April 2012

Prof Philippe Sands (UCL Laws) and Prof Richard Bellamy (UCL Public Policy) comment on recent British reactions to the ECtHR.


Human rights and Europe: Down to the Wire

Britain’s campaign to change the ECHR is about to be tested
14 Apr 2012 | The Economist

Many in Britain and elsewhere think the ECtHR has grown too big for its boots. The reforms currently proposed under British Chairmanship of the ECtHR would lighten the court’s load in part by tightening criteria for accepting cases and amending the convention to give national judicial systems more wriggle room. Some fear these measures would reduce not only the court’s workload but also its power. That power,As Philippe Sands argues, may not be vital in countries like Britain and Germany, but vital in states where, in the absence of an independent and effective local judiciary, “the court serves as a first and a last resort for individuals who are subject to real and extensive abuses.”

Read the full article here.


U.K.’s Fight to Deport Cleric Mirrors Old European Feuds

By Kit Chellel
24 April 2012 | Bloomberg

The U.K. hosted a summit last week on the future of the European Court of Human Rights even as relations were strained by a dispute over extraditing terrorism suspect Abu Qatada. Qatada’s case, in which he claims evidence obtained through torture will be used against him, has revived old arguments about Europe’s role in British affairs. Prime Minister David Cameron wants to limit the ECtHR’s remit; other British politicians want to go further and ignore the court’s rulings altogether. Yet the perception that the ECtHR tells the U.K. what to do is wrong, argues Richard Bellamy in this article. Less than 2 percent of cases the court heard since 1966 have resulted in local rulings being overturned. “Those very small number of cases that go against us is probably a salutary thing. It makes people think,” Bellamy said.

Read the full article here.