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COMMENTS 

'Highly problematic, to put it mildly'

Deciphering the Conservative Party’s proposals for a new ‘British Bill of Rights’ is not an easy task, as the eight-page policy document is riddled with errors, distortions and imprecise language. What is more, their two main policy aims are highly problematic, argues
Colm O'Cinneide
9 October 2014
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Starts: Oct 9, 2014 12:00:00 AM

UK & EU: New Faces, Old Problems?

The row between Britain and its allies that accompanied the nomination of Jean-Claude Juncker as the new Commission President was seen by some as an effective short-term tactic from David Cameron. But the ‘Juncker bounce’ was short-lived and left Cameron in a long-term strategic pickle.
Paola Buonadonna
6 October 2014
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Starts: Oct 6, 2014 12:00:00 AM

Five lessons of the Juncker Affair

It is now three months since Jean-Claude Juncker was elected President of the Commission, against the express wishes of the British and Hungarian governments.  What lessons can we draw from this episode about British attitudes to the European Union?
6 October 2014
Prof Michael Shackleton
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Starts: Oct 6, 2014 12:00:00 AM

Counterpoint and the Open Society European Policy Institute Looking for postgraduate experts

5 February 2013

The Bridges Project is a ground-breaking initiative jointly coordinated by Counterpoint and the Open Society European Policy Institute.

The project aims to reinvigorate policy-making in Europe by making cutting edge research insights available to policy-makers. In particular we are interested in how recent research findings in neuroscience, positive psychology, physics and complexity theory, behavioural economics, psychoanalysis, anthropology and social geography can and should transform the way policy makers understand the public, and how they elaborate and implement policy.

We are seeking two types of contributions:

  1. Literature reviews (2500-3000 words) that cover a specific aspect of your research field and how it should be understood by policy-makers or government more generally. The aim is to have a good survey of the field’s most innovative contributions and thinkers, as well as a sense of how this should influence thinking in policy circles and possible applications. 
  2. Essay form articles (2500-3000 words + bibliography) that demonstrate how vital contributions in your research field have been overlooked in mainstream European policy debates. How would policy, or policy thinking change if these vital contributions were taken on board?

For a full summary of the project and how to apply, please see the
Counterpoint website.