Welcome to the UCL European Institute, UCL's hub for research, collaboration and information on Europe and the European Union. We are part of the Institute of Advanced Studies.


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16 Taviton St
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WC1H 0BW
+44 (0) 207 679 8737
european.institute@ucl.ac.uk

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COMMENTS 

Migration, the lightning rod of the EU referendum

The EU-Turkey deal should have no role in the Brexit debate, yet it brings the crucial question of the European Union and migration into focus at an inopportune time.
14 April 2016
Uta Staiger
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Starts: Apr 14, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Unsettling times for a settled population? Polish perspectives on Brexit

Many Poles have lived, worked, and settled in the UK for up to 12 years now. Anne White, Professor of Polish Studies at the UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies, says it’s no longer so easy for them to pick up and leave.
14 April 2016
Anne White
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Starts: Apr 14, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Some thoughts on the psycho-geography of Europe’s free movement

Eastern European migration takes place in a very different context than it once did. Eva Hoffman, author and essayist, asks what drives people to leave, and what drives them back again? This piece is part of the UCL European Institute’s commissioning partnership with openDemocracy.
7 April 2016
Eva Hoffman
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Starts: Apr 7, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Counterpoint and the Open Society European Policy Institute Looking for postgraduate experts

5 February 2013

The Bridges Project is a ground-breaking initiative jointly coordinated by Counterpoint and the Open Society European Policy Institute.

The project aims to reinvigorate policy-making in Europe by making cutting edge research insights available to policy-makers. In particular we are interested in how recent research findings in neuroscience, positive psychology, physics and complexity theory, behavioural economics, psychoanalysis, anthropology and social geography can and should transform the way policy makers understand the public, and how they elaborate and implement policy.

We are seeking two types of contributions:

  1. Literature reviews (2500-3000 words) that cover a specific aspect of your research field and how it should be understood by policy-makers or government more generally. The aim is to have a good survey of the field’s most innovative contributions and thinkers, as well as a sense of how this should influence thinking in policy circles and possible applications. 
  2. Essay form articles (2500-3000 words + bibliography) that demonstrate how vital contributions in your research field have been overlooked in mainstream European policy debates. How would policy, or policy thinking change if these vital contributions were taken on board?

For a full summary of the project and how to apply, please see the
Counterpoint website.