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Why we post: a global perspective on social media

How do people use social media in different parts of the world, and what are the implications? Professor Daniel Miller explains what a team of anthropologists found by sending 15 months each in nine small towns all over the world, comparing social media use. You can engage with their research through a variety of free online resources including UCL’s first massive open online course (MOOC) starting on 29th February, a series of open access books published by UCL Press, and a short video.
25 November 2015
Daniel Miller  More...

Starts: Nov 25, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Cameron - Banning Milk and Cheese

Pablo Echenique is one of the five Podemos members elected to the European Parliament in 2014, and currently running for parliament in the upcoming Spanish general election. On Monday 26 October, he was scheduled to talk at the UCL European Institute, however the event had to be cancelled when he ran into difficulties at the UK Border. Here, he explains the full story…
2 November 2015
Pablo Echenique

Starts: Nov 1, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Flights from Freedom

Eva Hoffman, former editor of The New York Times and Visiting Professor at the UCL European Institute, asks what propels individuals to turn to extremist movements and argues that we need to build a ‘culture of democracy’ with shared norms and ethics.
22 October 2015
Eva Hoffman More...

Starts: Oct 22, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Counterpoint and the Open Society European Policy Institute Looking for postgraduate experts

5 February 2013

The Bridges Project is a ground-breaking initiative jointly coordinated by Counterpoint and the Open Society European Policy Institute.

The project aims to reinvigorate policy-making in Europe by making cutting edge research insights available to policy-makers. In particular we are interested in how recent research findings in neuroscience, positive psychology, physics and complexity theory, behavioural economics, psychoanalysis, anthropology and social geography can and should transform the way policy makers understand the public, and how they elaborate and implement policy.

We are seeking two types of contributions:

  1. Literature reviews (2500-3000 words) that cover a specific aspect of your research field and how it should be understood by policy-makers or government more generally. The aim is to have a good survey of the field’s most innovative contributions and thinkers, as well as a sense of how this should influence thinking in policy circles and possible applications. 
  2. Essay form articles (2500-3000 words + bibliography) that demonstrate how vital contributions in your research field have been overlooked in mainstream European policy debates. How would policy, or policy thinking change if these vital contributions were taken on board?

For a full summary of the project and how to apply, please see the
Counterpoint website.