Welcome to the UCL European Institute, UCL's hub for research, collaboration and information on Europe and the European Union. We are part of the Institute of Advanced Studies.


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16 Taviton St
London
WC1H 0BW
+44 (0) 207 679 8737
european.institute@ucl.ac.uk

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COMMENTS 

Does Eastern Europe have lessons for Brexit Britain?

What, if anything, can the experience of (research on) Eastern Europe say to us as we head towards Brexit? Lessons may lie above all in getting to grips with the tempo and nature of political change, its (un)predictability and likely channels.
Sean Hanley
1 August 2016
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Starts: Aug 1, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Hollande's response to the Nice massacre will please only the far right

On Thursday night, for the third time since January 2015, President François Hollande was faced with a mass murder on French soil. An ashen-faced Hollande, almost looking like a broken man, appeared on television on Friday at 4am and declared: “This is undoubtedly a terrorist attack; the whole of France is under the threat of an Islamic terrorist attack”.
Philippe Marlière
18 July 2016 More...

Starts: Jul 18, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Roman oratory and the EU referendum campaigns

In addition to marking a politically decisive moment in British history, the campaigns in advance of the referendum on the UK’s membership in the EU were exciting objects of study for Classicists in terms of the political use of oratory.
Gesine Manuwald
11 July 2016 More...

Starts: Jul 11, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Successful Bid to the European Commission

5 October 2010

The Institute has just been awarded a project grant from the Commission Representation in London.

We successfully applied under the Representation's third call for proposals targeted at UK university departments and think tanks, which were invited to draw on their policy expertise and networking capacity to promote academic and public debate in their local communities.

The project, entitled "EU Citizenship and the Market: rights and identity in London’s European communities", will examine the contested notion of a European citizenship, its associated rights and opportunities for democratic participation.

Despite some amendments, the bulk of rights associated with European citizenship is still related to the the free movement of persons, goods, services and capital across the Community's internal market. While these enhance our personal liberty, allow us to coordinate and work freely with each other, and give us the opportunity to exert pressure and even seek rights of redress, such a ‘market citizenship’ has been judged by some to be not only passive and ‘thin’, but even as undermining social solidarity. At the same time, it may well be argued that it is precisely these economic rights, which have empowered citizens to move within the EU and settle in another member state. An alternative reading might thus see these market-related rights as a potential basis for a postnational kind of citizenship, in which rights and perhaps, ultimately, solidarity, are disassociated from national and territorially circumscribed membership of a state.

Our project will seek there to discuss precisely this relation between European citizenship and the market. To what extent is citizenship of the Union going beyond the market today? Or is it in fact coupled increasingly firmly to it?  And if so, is that necessarily a bad thing? Is talk of ‘mere’ market citizenship misguided if it provides not only real, tangible benefits for many citizens, but also leads them to identify more closely with their fellow Europeans? The objective is to discuss, learn and convey information about how exactly European citizens use their market-related rights when they move to, or do business with, another member state of the Union, and how this usage affects in practice their sense of identity and solidarity. 

The project will comprise three events. The first two are conversation rounds with focus groups from European communities living in London. These are followed by a one-day event including two public keynote addresses by Commissioner Vivianne Reding (tbc) and Prof Richard Bellamy (Director of the UCL EUropean Institute) and a workshop session with invited academics, policy-makers and experts. These will form the basis of a report highlighting the normative, legal and policy implications of the discussions, which will be published and made available to the participating institutions and the public.

For more information, please contact us.