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Why we post: a global perspective on social media

How do people use social media in different parts of the world, and what are the implications? Professor Daniel Miller explains what a team of anthropologists found by sending 15 months each in nine small towns all over the world, comparing social media use. You can engage with their research through a variety of free online resources including UCL’s first massive open online course (MOOC) starting on 29th February, a series of open access books published by UCL Press, and a short video.
25 November 2015
Daniel Miller  More...

Starts: Nov 25, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Cameron - Banning Milk and Cheese

Pablo Echenique is one of the five Podemos members elected to the European Parliament in 2014, and currently running for parliament in the upcoming Spanish general election. On Monday 26 October, he was scheduled to talk at the UCL European Institute, however the event had to be cancelled when he ran into difficulties at the UK Border. Here, he explains the full story…
2 November 2015
Pablo Echenique

Starts: Nov 1, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Flights from Freedom

Eva Hoffman, former editor of The New York Times and Visiting Professor at the UCL European Institute, asks what propels individuals to turn to extremist movements and argues that we need to build a ‘culture of democracy’ with shared norms and ethics.
22 October 2015
Eva Hoffman More...

Starts: Oct 22, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Successful Bid to the European Commission

5 October 2010

The Institute has just been awarded a project grant from the Commission Representation in London.

We successfully applied under the Representation's third call for proposals targeted at UK university departments and think tanks, which were invited to draw on their policy expertise and networking capacity to promote academic and public debate in their local communities.

The project, entitled "EU Citizenship and the Market: rights and identity in London’s European communities", will examine the contested notion of a European citizenship, its associated rights and opportunities for democratic participation.

Despite some amendments, the bulk of rights associated with European citizenship is still related to the the free movement of persons, goods, services and capital across the Community's internal market. While these enhance our personal liberty, allow us to coordinate and work freely with each other, and give us the opportunity to exert pressure and even seek rights of redress, such a ‘market citizenship’ has been judged by some to be not only passive and ‘thin’, but even as undermining social solidarity. At the same time, it may well be argued that it is precisely these economic rights, which have empowered citizens to move within the EU and settle in another member state. An alternative reading might thus see these market-related rights as a potential basis for a postnational kind of citizenship, in which rights and perhaps, ultimately, solidarity, are disassociated from national and territorially circumscribed membership of a state.

Our project will seek there to discuss precisely this relation between European citizenship and the market. To what extent is citizenship of the Union going beyond the market today? Or is it in fact coupled increasingly firmly to it?  And if so, is that necessarily a bad thing? Is talk of ‘mere’ market citizenship misguided if it provides not only real, tangible benefits for many citizens, but also leads them to identify more closely with their fellow Europeans? The objective is to discuss, learn and convey information about how exactly European citizens use their market-related rights when they move to, or do business with, another member state of the Union, and how this usage affects in practice their sense of identity and solidarity. 

The project will comprise three events. The first two are conversation rounds with focus groups from European communities living in London. These are followed by a one-day event including two public keynote addresses by Commissioner Vivianne Reding (tbc) and Prof Richard Bellamy (Director of the UCL EUropean Institute) and a workshop session with invited academics, policy-makers and experts. These will form the basis of a report highlighting the normative, legal and policy implications of the discussions, which will be published and made available to the participating institutions and the public.

For more information, please contact us.