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COMMENTS 

From Indyref to Indignados: how passions and politics mix

As Scotland heads to the polls, this piece discusses the extent to which emotions have arrived at the heart of contemporary politics – yet we still hesitate to admit it. Emotions can neither be banished nor ignored when we discuss what constitutes political communities, how political decisions should be made and political action springs into being. Yet to embrace the rise of emotional politics without acknowledging how intimately it is and should be entangled with reason equally risks undermining just political action.
Dr Uta Staiger
18 September 2014
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Starts: Sep 18, 2014 12:00:00 AM

10 things you need to know about what will happen if Scotland votes yes

As the Scottish independence referendum draws closer the outcome is hard to predict. Both Westminster politicians and the wider public are asking what – in practical terms – would happen if the Scots were to vote Yes. Robert Hazell offers a 10-point overview of what the road to independence might look like.
Professor Robert Hazell
9 September 2014
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Starts: Sep 9, 2014 12:00:00 AM

The truth is, Scandinavia is neither heaven nor hell

The Nordic countries have received exceptionally good press in the UK - at least until earlier this year, when British travel writer and resident of Denmark, Michael Booth, claimed to dispel the of Scandinavia as the perfect place to live. Many are now confused. Is everything we believed about the social ideals of Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland a lie? Well, not entirely but we’re not all drunk serial killers either.
Dr Jakob Stougaard-Nielsen
19 August 2014 More...

Starts: Sep 8, 2014 12:00:00 AM

Migration Research Unit Student Conference 2014 Child & Youth Migrants: Global And Interdisciplinary Perspectives

27 February 2014

The Migration Research Unit welcome applications from Master’s and PhD students from a variety of disciplines.


Call for papers

According to a 2013 UN report, there are 232 million individuals living outside their country of origin today—approximately 35 million of these are children and young people under the age of 20.

In exploring the challenges that these young people face, the tensions and frictions that exist between internationally-recognized human rights, national politics, and lived experience become readily apparent. Much work has been done on the educational opportunities and attainment of migrant children, and recent initiatives including the 2013 UN International Youth Day ‘Youth Migration: Moving Development Forward’ have highlighted the effect of young migrants on societal development. The increased visibility of grassroots efforts like the DREAMer movement in the United States has also proven that there are many perspectives to be heard on issues of youth and child migration.

The third annual UCL Migration Research Unit Student Conference wants to build upon this discussion and provide a chance for the new voices of migration studies to share their research. It seeks to explore, through global comparison, the complex issues facing mobile youth that are frequently overshadowed by more general debates about labour, forced, or family migration. How do generational dynamics in migrant families and communities affect questions of access, agency, and identity? In what ways do young migrants become a link, both culturally and linguistically, between their families and their country of residence? When immigration is seen as one, unified issue in policy making and public discourse do the nuances of child and youth migration fall between the cracks? The conference will be a forum for discussion between students, human rights and advocacy groups, and migrant community organizations.


We welcome applications from Master’s and PhD students from a variety of disciplines conducting research in, but not limited to, the following areas:

The best interest of the child:

  • Changing family dynamics & reunification
  • Caring for health & disability
  • Young irregular migrants and refugees, unaccompanied minors

Laws, rights & social justice:

  • Detention and deportation of minors
  • Layering of rights (including rights of the child, of migrants, human rights, minority, LGBT, etc.)

Access to the public sphere:

  • Political access, activism, advocacy & community organising
  • Perceptions of young migrants in the media and popular discussion
  • Access to higher education

Looking to the future:

  • Secondary migration & young return migrants
  • Transnationalism & questions of identity and belonging
  • Transitioning into adulthood (and its social and legal consequences)
Please submit applications with a title, 1 page abstract, and CV to: geog.migrationconference@ucl.ac.uk no later than 1 March 2014.

Presentations will be about 20 minutes long. If you will require a visa to attend the conference, please consider submitting your application before the deadline to ensure you have enough time to apply for your visa.