Welcome to the UCL European Institute, UCL's hub for research, collaboration and information on Europe and the European Union. We are part of the Institute of Advanced Studies.


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WC1H 0BW
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COMMENTS 

Does Eastern Europe have lessons for Brexit Britain?

What, if anything, can the experience of (research on) Eastern Europe say to us as we head towards Brexit? Lessons may lie above all in getting to grips with the tempo and nature of political change, its (un)predictability and likely channels.
Sean Hanley
1 August 2016
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Starts: Aug 1, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Hollande's response to the Nice massacre will please only the far right

On Thursday night, for the third time since January 2015, President François Hollande was faced with a mass murder on French soil. An ashen-faced Hollande, almost looking like a broken man, appeared on television on Friday at 4am and declared: “This is undoubtedly a terrorist attack; the whole of France is under the threat of an Islamic terrorist attack”.
Philippe Marlière
18 July 2016 More...

Starts: Jul 18, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Roman oratory and the EU referendum campaigns

In addition to marking a politically decisive moment in British history, the campaigns in advance of the referendum on the UK’s membership in the EU were exciting objects of study for Classicists in terms of the political use of oratory.
Gesine Manuwald
11 July 2016 More...

Starts: Jul 11, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Migration Research Unit Student Conference 2014 Child & Youth Migrants: Global And Interdisciplinary Perspectives

27 February 2014

The Migration Research Unit welcome applications from Master’s and PhD students from a variety of disciplines.


Call for papers

According to a 2013 UN report, there are 232 million individuals living outside their country of origin today—approximately 35 million of these are children and young people under the age of 20.

In exploring the challenges that these young people face, the tensions and frictions that exist between internationally-recognized human rights, national politics, and lived experience become readily apparent. Much work has been done on the educational opportunities and attainment of migrant children, and recent initiatives including the 2013 UN International Youth Day ‘Youth Migration: Moving Development Forward’ have highlighted the effect of young migrants on societal development. The increased visibility of grassroots efforts like the DREAMer movement in the United States has also proven that there are many perspectives to be heard on issues of youth and child migration.

The third annual UCL Migration Research Unit Student Conference wants to build upon this discussion and provide a chance for the new voices of migration studies to share their research. It seeks to explore, through global comparison, the complex issues facing mobile youth that are frequently overshadowed by more general debates about labour, forced, or family migration. How do generational dynamics in migrant families and communities affect questions of access, agency, and identity? In what ways do young migrants become a link, both culturally and linguistically, between their families and their country of residence? When immigration is seen as one, unified issue in policy making and public discourse do the nuances of child and youth migration fall between the cracks? The conference will be a forum for discussion between students, human rights and advocacy groups, and migrant community organizations.


We welcome applications from Master’s and PhD students from a variety of disciplines conducting research in, but not limited to, the following areas:

The best interest of the child:

  • Changing family dynamics & reunification
  • Caring for health & disability
  • Young irregular migrants and refugees, unaccompanied minors

Laws, rights & social justice:

  • Detention and deportation of minors
  • Layering of rights (including rights of the child, of migrants, human rights, minority, LGBT, etc.)

Access to the public sphere:

  • Political access, activism, advocacy & community organising
  • Perceptions of young migrants in the media and popular discussion
  • Access to higher education

Looking to the future:

  • Secondary migration & young return migrants
  • Transnationalism & questions of identity and belonging
  • Transitioning into adulthood (and its social and legal consequences)
Please submit applications with a title, 1 page abstract, and CV to: geog.migrationconference@ucl.ac.uk no later than 1 March 2014.

Presentations will be about 20 minutes long. If you will require a visa to attend the conference, please consider submitting your application before the deadline to ensure you have enough time to apply for your visa.