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COMMENTS 

It's Brexit.

A first round of reactions from UCL staff to the EU referendum results.
24 June 2016 More...

Starts: Jun 27, 2016 12:00:00 AM

The heart of the matter: passion, politics and the EU referendum

Both Leave and Remain have appealed to voters’ guts to the extent that reason itself has become suspicious. Emotions will rule the day on 23 June, but at what cost?
23 June 2016
Uta Staiger
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Starts: Jun 23, 2016 12:00:00 AM

The price of solidarity: is Brexit worth it?

A misunderstanding of history and of historical time has put European solidarity on the chopping block. Think carefully before allowing the axe to swing, pleads Jan Kubik, Director of the School of Slavonic & East European Studies at UCL.
23 June 2016
Jan Kubik
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Starts: Jun 23, 2016 12:00:00 AM

What is the meaning of the ‘vampire graves’ unearthed in Poland?

22 July 2013

Dr Tim Beasley-Murray (UCL School of Slavonic and Eastern European Studies) says the root of the vampire legend goes right back to ancient Egypt and Greece. 


The world's media have been getting their teeth into the story of a "vampire grave" uncovered last week by archaeologists at a roadside construction site in the town of Gliwice in southern Poland. When four skeletons were found with their skulls placed between their legs, speculation followed that these were suspected vampires that had been prevented from rising from the grave through the once-ritualistic local practice of decapitation.

Interviewed by the Guardian, Dr Tim Beasley-Murray (UCL SSEES), who teaches on a course entitled Vampires, Society and Culture: Transylvania and Beyond, explained that the root of the vampire legend goes right back to ancient Egypt and Greece. The myth then spread up through the Balkans into eastern Europe where it proved fertile during the pre-Christian era: "There is a strong Slavic belief in spirits. Romanian folklore has vampiric figures such as the moroi and strigoi. The word 'mora' means nightmare. But these are common to many cultures. We often see bird- or owl-like figures that swoop down and feed on you."

Read the full article in The Guardian >>