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Do Not Fear Austerity: A Public Meeting with Yanis Varoufakis

Alessandro de Arcangelis, UCL PhD student in History, reports on a ‘public meeting’ with Yanis Varoufakis, and his advice to Jeremy Corbyn.
30 September 2015
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Starts: Oct 1, 2015 12:00:00 AM

A Syrian tragedy turning into a European tragedy

Gëzim Krasniqi, Fellow at UCL’s School of Slavonic and East European Studies, traces the shifting routes chosen by refugees from Syria—and how the EU’s lack of a coordinated policy has been turning the Syrian tragedy into a European one. It has left the Balkan states with a refugee crisis impossible to master.
23 September 2015
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Starts: Sep 23, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Fathers, Sons, and Grandfathers: Migration Across Generations

Through the stories of three generations in thirty families, Julia Brannen explores men's lives, migration, employment, fatherhood, father-son relationships and intergenerational transmission over the life course. As the worst refugee crisis since the Second World War unfolds across continents, she traces the stories of migrant generations that have gone before, of Irish grandfathers who left Ireland in the mid-20th century and Polish fathers who came to Britain in the 21st century, together with a group of white British 
9 September 2015
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Starts: Sep 9, 2015 12:00:00 AM

What is the meaning of the ‘vampire graves’ unearthed in Poland?

22 July 2013

Dr Tim Beasley-Murray (UCL School of Slavonic and Eastern European Studies) says the root of the vampire legend goes right back to ancient Egypt and Greece. 

The world's media have been getting their teeth into the story of a "vampire grave" uncovered last week by archaeologists at a roadside construction site in the town of Gliwice in southern Poland. When four skeletons were found with their skulls placed between their legs, speculation followed that these were suspected vampires that had been prevented from rising from the grave through the once-ritualistic local practice of decapitation.

Interviewed by the Guardian, Dr Tim Beasley-Murray (UCL SSEES), who teaches on a course entitled Vampires, Society and Culture: Transylvania and Beyond, explained that the root of the vampire legend goes right back to ancient Egypt and Greece. The myth then spread up through the Balkans into eastern Europe where it proved fertile during the pre-Christian era: "There is a strong Slavic belief in spirits. Romanian folklore has vampiric figures such as the moroi and strigoi. The word 'mora' means nightmare. But these are common to many cultures. We often see bird- or owl-like figures that swoop down and feed on you."

Read the full article in The Guardian >>