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COMMENTS 

Britain has lost a role, and failed to find an empire

Theresa May's long-awaited Brexit speech must be understood as an aspiration, rather than a roadmap, since its realisation requires the consent of other parties and the removal of important contradictions, argues Benjamin Martill.
17 January 2017
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Starts: Jan 17, 2017 12:00:00 AM

The aftermath of Berlin: what implications for German politics?

Uta Staiger, Executive Director of the European Institute, comments on the German political and media responses after the Christmas market attacks, in a piece originally published by the New Statesman.
20 December 2016
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Starts: Dec 20, 2016 12:00:00 AM

What will Brexit mean for London's digital entrepreneurs?

Oliver Patel, Research Assistant at the European Institute, offers three reasons why the Brexit vote is worrying for London's tech community.
Oliver Patel (UCL European Institute)
19 December 2016
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Starts: Dec 19, 2016 12:00:00 AM

What is the meaning of the ‘vampire graves’ unearthed in Poland?

22 July 2013

Dr Tim Beasley-Murray (UCL School of Slavonic and Eastern European Studies) says the root of the vampire legend goes right back to ancient Egypt and Greece. 


The world's media have been getting their teeth into the story of a "vampire grave" uncovered last week by archaeologists at a roadside construction site in the town of Gliwice in southern Poland. When four skeletons were found with their skulls placed between their legs, speculation followed that these were suspected vampires that had been prevented from rising from the grave through the once-ritualistic local practice of decapitation.

Interviewed by the Guardian, Dr Tim Beasley-Murray (UCL SSEES), who teaches on a course entitled Vampires, Society and Culture: Transylvania and Beyond, explained that the root of the vampire legend goes right back to ancient Egypt and Greece. The myth then spread up through the Balkans into eastern Europe where it proved fertile during the pre-Christian era: "There is a strong Slavic belief in spirits. Romanian folklore has vampiric figures such as the moroi and strigoi. The word 'mora' means nightmare. But these are common to many cultures. We often see bird- or owl-like figures that swoop down and feed on you."

Read the full article in The Guardian >>