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Brexit and empire: a long-term view

Can a long-term and comparative understanding of the nature of imperial identities shed light on some of the dynamics behind Brexit? The ways in which empires – and their collapse – transform their central regions as much as the colonies constitute a significant part of the story, argues Andrew Gardner, summarising an article recently published in the Journal of Social Archaeology.
Andrew Gardner (Institute of Archaeology)
20 February 2017
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Starts: Feb 20, 2017 12:00:00 AM

The government's Brexit white paper: a missed opportunity

Nicholas Wright from the UCL School of Public Policy analyses the government's recent White Paper on Brexit.
Nicholas Wright (SPP)
17 February 2017
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Starts: Feb 17, 2017 12:00:00 AM

The process of Brexit: What comes next?

In a new report published jointly by the UCL Constitution Unit and the UCL European Institute, Alan Renwick,  Deputy Director of the Constitution Unit, examines what the process of Brexit is likely to look like over the coming weeks, months, and years. Here he summarises five key lessons.
Alan Renwick (Constitution Unit)
8 February 2017
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Starts: Feb 1, 2017 12:00:00 AM

UCL European Institute

Christian Joerges: Europe's Constitutional Form


'Unity in Diversity’ was the fortunate motto of the ill-fated Draft Constitutional Treaty. This motto deserves to be kept alive, despite this failure and even more so under the impression of the present all too rash claims for centralising moves outside cumbersome treaty amendment procedures. It seems even safe to say that the challenges that it articulates have become even more obvious: The Member States of the European Union are no longer autonomous but in many ways, inter-dependent and hence depend upon co-operation. And yet, this interdependence contrasts strikingly with an ever greater socio-economic diversity, new schisms between Eurozone countries and other members of the Union, conflicts between north and south, creditors and debtors.

In view of the diversity in the histories of European democracies, their uneven potential and/or willingness to pursue objectives of distributional justice, their different memories of economic and financial crises, differentiating answers suggest themselves. The sustainability of the whole European project seems to depend upon the construction and institutionalisation of a “third way” between or beyond the defence of the nation state, on the one hand, and federalist or quasi-federalist ambitions, on the other. Conflicts-law constitutionalism is the third way which this talk explored and defended.


Unity in Diversity as Europe’s Vocation and Conflicts Law as Europe’s Constitutional Form from UCL European Institute on Vimeo.



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