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Media Gallery 

COMMENTS 

EU referendum: the view of a UCL clinician-scientist

John Martin, Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at UCL, argues that scientific advance relies on creativity, cooperation, and financing. To leave the EU would diminish all three, dimming the light of British science in the world and threatening the UK’s future economy. This piece is part of the UCL European Institute’s commissioning partnership with openDemocracy. For more on this topic, join the UCL European Institute for its high-level panel discussion EU Membership and UK Science on 12 May.
10 May 2016
John Martin
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Starts: May 10, 2016 12:00:00 AM

‘Eurofog’ of claim and counterclaim on EU membership and UK science

Graeme Reid, Professor of Science and Research Policy at UCL, recently advised a House of Lords inquiry on the impact of EU membership on UK  science and research. In this post, he discusses the inquiry’s main findings, both expected and unexpected. He also joins a high-level panel to discuss the topic at the UCL European Institute on 12 May 2016.
10 May 2016
Graeme Reid
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Starts: May 10, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Something rotten in the state of Czechia?

The Czech Republic has been in the news recently because of its politicians' somewhat quick Celtic campaign to rebrand the country to the world as ‘Czechia’. But among political scientists and businesspeople the country's name has long suffered worst damage than this.
5 May 2016
Dr Sean Hanley
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Starts: May 5, 2016 12:00:00 AM

UCL European Institute

eMigrating Landscapes 2: The New Europeans?


Debate on contemporary Europeans, new ideas about borders and “New Europeans?” Grażyna Plebanek and AM Bakalar

A meeting with the authors hosted by Urszula Chowaniec. The discussion and commentary by Tim Beasley-Murray and Agata Pyzik.

Since the post-communist transformations of the late 1980s and the 1990s in Eastern and Central Europe and the ensuing EU enlargement of 2004, migration has become a significant trait within contemporary Europe and an increasingly important factor in social conflict affecting various parts of the continent. Contemporary migration and/or emigration has brought a new political rhetoric, resulting in social turmoil as well as new cultural, literary and artistic production. In our seminar series in 2013, these problems will be scrutinized based on the discussion on particular literary and cultural events within Polish culture.


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