Welcome to the UCL European Institute, UCL's hub for research, collaboration and information on Europe and the European Union. We are part of the Institute of Advanced Studies.


UCL European Institute
trans32.pngtrans32.pngtrans32.pngtrans32.png

Media Gallery 

COMMENTS 

You can't blame Brussels for Brexit

It is not clear that the EU is any less accountable than national governments.
29 June 2016
Ronan McCrea More...

Starts: Jun 30, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Brexit: The mother of all uncertainties

So the British people have voted with a margin of around 4%, a little more than 1 million votes, to leave the European Union (EU). Where this will lead lies somewhere between two absolutely contrasting scenarios.
29 June 2016
Paul Ekins More...

Starts: Jun 29, 2016 12:00:00 AM

It's Brexit.

A first round of reactions from UCL staff to the EU referendum results.
24 June 2016 More...

Starts: Jun 27, 2016 12:00:00 AM

UCL European Institute

Lost worlds of East European Jewry: images and narratives


Part of the 2013-14 series In Place(s) of Memory, which the UCL European Institute is organising with the Institut Français in London, this joint lecture features contributions from Prof Michael Berkowitz (UCL Hebrew & Jewish) and Prof Delphine Bechtel (Université Paris IV Sorbonne).


Lost worlds of East European Jewry: images and narratives from UCL European Institute on Vimeo.


Professor Delphine Bechtel: (UFR d’Etudes Germaniques, Paris IV Sorbonne)
Competing memories of multicultural Jewish Lemberg: narratives and traces Lemberg, Lwow, Lvov, Lviv has been home for centuries to Poles, Jews and Ukrainians. After the Holocaust and the expulsion of Poles following World War 2, the city has become predominantly Ukrainian and is today the centre of the Ukrainian nationalist movement. Competing narratives about the past of this former multicultural city are clashing today with remnants and traces of the past, as Jews, Poles and Ukrainians are vindicating the city as their own.

Professor Michael Berkowitz:
(UCL Hebrew and Jewish)
European Jews and photography:  Autobiography, evasion, integrity
This presentation concentrates on the rich autobiographical work of I. J. Singer (interwar Warsaw) and Bernard Gotfryd (Radom ghetto) pertaining to their vocations in photography, also drawing on fictional and autobiographical writings of Hans Keilson, Giselle Freund, Lotte Jacobi, Alfred Stieglitz, and H. W. Barnett.  It comprises an initial attempt to integrate reflections that were specific to Jewish photographers in certain periods and cities, as well as to sketch an overall sense of the Jewish engagement with photography, which is only beginning to emerge as a scholarly subject.

Page last modified on 12 feb 14 12:25