Welcome to the UCL European Institute, UCL's hub for research, collaboration and information on Europe and the European Union.

Contact us

16 Taviton St
London
WC1H 0BW
+44 (0) 207 679 8737
european.institute@ucl.ac.uk

How to find us >>

trans32.pngtrans32.pngtrans32.pngtrans32.png

COMMENTS 

The Dilemmas of European Decision-making and the Illegitimacy of the Fiscal Compact

EU decision-making assumes agreement at two levels: the national and the European. The dilemma highlighted by the crisis is how to make collective EU decisions acceptable not just to the 28 governments and MEPs but also to each of the peoples they represent. This problem cannot be resolved by either taking problematic decisions out of the political domain or confining them to decision-making purely at the EU level.
Prof Richard Bellamy
February 2014 More...

Starts: Feb 26, 2014 12:00:00 AM

From Sick Man of Europe to Economic Superstar

New research suggests that economic policy played no essential role in the dramatic resurgence of Germany’s economy, with important lessons for Europe.
Prof Christian Dustmann et.al.
February 2014 More...

Starts: Feb 5, 2014 12:00:00 AM

Horizon 2020 Launches! What Can We Expect?

After many months of plans, news and social media chatter, the EU’s new “Horizon 2020” programme for investing €70 billion* in science and innovation from 2014-2020, has launched. The first calls are now online and UCL plans to be at the forefront of participation.
Dr Michael Galsworthy
January 2014
More...

Starts: Jan 7, 2014 12:00:00 AM

Green Social Democracy

Publication date: Feb 13, 2013 5:15:34 PM

Start: Feb 12, 2013 9:00:00 AM

Michael Jacobs

Prof Michael Jacobs
February 2013

Despite its worthy motives, social market philosophy provides neither a useful analytical framework for understanding modern capitalism, nor the policy tools to address our present economic and social predicament.  The concept of ‘market failure’, with its underlying assumption of market equilibrium, does not capture the systemically adverse outcomes of collective market forces.  A more sophisticated understanding of capitalist economies, and the societies in which they exist, would recognise that the market economy is a dynamic but not self-regulating system.  It is embedded in, and impacts on, four other economies – of the natural environment, of family and care, of voluntary association, and of the public sector – which operate under different motivations and allocative principles.  The role of government is central, to balance the values created by different kinds of institutions and to constrain the dynamic impacts of market forces.  A number of policy conclusions are offered arising from this framework.

Biography: Michael Jacobs is Visiting Professor in the Department of Political Science / School of Public Policy at University College London and Co-Editor of The Political Quarterly.

Acknowledgements: Fabian Society