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COMMENTS 

How come “intolerant” Poland is among European leaders in collecting data on hate crimes?

In Poland over the past ten years, there has been a creeping recognition of the need to combat hate crime. While intolerance remains an issue in this Central European country, developments in in the official response to targeted violence are evident. Nevertheless, it is unclear what motivated the authorities to address this issue. Piotr Godzisz, PhD candidate at UCL SSEES, explores what explains Poland’s leadership in this regard.
14 January 2016
Piotr Godzisz More...

Starts: Jan 14, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Maps in Films: the View from Ealing

In the website The Cine-Tourist, Roland-François Lack, Senior Lecturer in UCL’s Department of French, has created a repository for his research around cinema and place. Here he illustrates some connections between maps and films.
1 February 2016
Roland-François Lack More...

Starts: Feb 4, 2016 12:00:00 AM

How ISIS Rule and Mobilisation Matters for the Military Response to the Paris Attacks

Kristin Bakke, Senior Lecturer in Political Science looks at how air strikes may affect ISIS, given how ISIS rules and how it mobilises support and recruits fighters. Although air strikes might contribute to containing the group and its ability to rule, it is likely to fuel the narrative that fosters mobilisation. To the degree that there is a case for a military response against ISIS, it is, by itself, insufficient. More...

Starts: Dec 16, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Green Social Democracy

Publication date: Feb 13, 2013 05:15 PM

Start: Feb 12, 2013 09:00 AM

Michael Jacobs

Prof Michael Jacobs
February 2013

Despite its worthy motives, social market philosophy provides neither a useful analytical framework for understanding modern capitalism, nor the policy tools to address our present economic and social predicament.  The concept of ‘market failure’, with its underlying assumption of market equilibrium, does not capture the systemically adverse outcomes of collective market forces.  A more sophisticated understanding of capitalist economies, and the societies in which they exist, would recognise that the market economy is a dynamic but not self-regulating system.  It is embedded in, and impacts on, four other economies – of the natural environment, of family and care, of voluntary association, and of the public sector – which operate under different motivations and allocative principles.  The role of government is central, to balance the values created by different kinds of institutions and to constrain the dynamic impacts of market forces.  A number of policy conclusions are offered arising from this framework.

Biography: Michael Jacobs is Visiting Professor in the Department of Political Science / School of Public Policy at University College London and Co-Editor of The Political Quarterly.

Acknowledgements: Fabian Society