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COMMENTS 

Immigration deserves a proper, open debate.

In a letter to the Financial Times, UCL's Professor of EU Law Piet Eeckhout outlines his bemusement at the current discourse on immigration in the UK.
Prof Piet Eeckhout
3 December 2014

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Starts: Dec 9, 2014 12:00:00 AM

The Democratic Disconnect

In the eurozone, the EU needs greater legitimacy at the national level not only to secure space for domestic politics but also to secure respect for social and economic commitments over time.
Prof. Albert Weale
24 November 2014 More...

Starts: Nov 24, 2014 12:00:00 AM

Europe: Six decades of strife and controversy for UK

It's groundhog day in Britain, where the European Union is concerned. The context changes, but the basic issues do not.
Sir Stephen Wall
18 November 2014 More...

Starts: Nov 18, 2014 12:00:00 AM

Working Paper: Rethinking European Integration after the Debt Crisis

Publication date: Sep 27, 2012 07:39 PM

Start: Jun 21, 2012 12:00 AM
End: Oct 12, 2012 12:00 AM

Prof Giandomenico Majone (EUI)
June 2012

Majone


A decade and a half after his groundbreaking arguments on the regulatory nature of the European Union and the case against the democratic deficit, Giandomenico Majone argues in this recent Working Paper, presented at UCL in June 2012, that the problems revealed by the crisis of monetary union, and the crisis itself, have their roots in the method of integration methods itself. The crisis, he argues, reveals the fundamental structural flaws in the European edifice – flaws concealed in the past by what he had previously called the prevailing “political culture of total optimism” (Majone 2011). In a severe attack on the democratic deficit he now diagnoses as being in full swing, Majone analyses these integration methods and beliefs, the limits of a one-size-fits-all policy model and the fragility of supranational institutions, before reflecting on the implications for teaching European integration after the debt crisis.