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COMMENTS 

What Next? Legislative Authority for Triggering Article 50

The decision of the Supreme Court that Article 50 TEU cannot be invoked without Parliamentary approval means the Government must consider the form of such an Act without delay, argues Jeff King in a post first published on the UK Constitutional Law Association Blog.
Jeff King (UCL Laws)
24 January 2017
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Starts: Jan 24, 2017 12:00:00 AM

Britain has lost a role, and failed to find an empire

Theresa May's long-awaited Brexit speech must be understood as an aspiration, rather than a roadmap, since its realisation requires the consent of other parties and the removal of important contradictions, argues Benjamin Martill.
17 January 2017
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Starts: Jan 17, 2017 12:00:00 AM

The aftermath of Berlin: what implications for German politics?

Uta Staiger, Executive Director of the European Institute, comments on the German political and media responses after the Christmas market attacks, in a piece originally published by the New Statesman.
20 December 2016
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Starts: Dec 20, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Working Paper: Rethinking European Integration after the Debt Crisis

Publication date: Sep 27, 2012 07:39 PM

Start: Jun 21, 2012 12:00 AM
End: Oct 12, 2012 12:00 AM

Prof Giandomenico Majone (EUI)
June 2012

Majone


A decade and a half after his groundbreaking arguments on the regulatory nature of the European Union and the case against the democratic deficit, Giandomenico Majone argues in this recent Working Paper, presented at UCL in June 2012, that the problems revealed by the crisis of monetary union, and the crisis itself, have their roots in the method of integration methods itself. The crisis, he argues, reveals the fundamental structural flaws in the European edifice – flaws concealed in the past by what he had previously called the prevailing “political culture of total optimism” (Majone 2011). In a severe attack on the democratic deficit he now diagnoses as being in full swing, Majone analyses these integration methods and beliefs, the limits of a one-size-fits-all policy model and the fragility of supranational institutions, before reflecting on the implications for teaching European integration after the debt crisis.