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COMMENTS 

A Question of Trust

The age-old question of what holds our societies together re-emerges periodically, particularly in times of crisis. In a world ever more globalised and virtual, the answer is often cast in terms of "trust", with its pivotal role as regularly called upon as its health called into question. How has trust risen to this centrality, and is it all as straightforward as it seems?
Dr Uta Staiger
13 August 2014
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Starts: Aug 13, 2014 12:00:00 AM

"A bad day for Europe"?

Juncker’s nomination was not a sudden, not an unexpected and not even a distinct event. Neither does it spell an end to the European Council’s dominance in constitutional politics or make EU reform less likely.
Dr Christine Reh
2 July 2014
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Starts: Jul 1, 2014 12:00:00 AM

When anger masks apathy

As a closer look at the European Parliament Elections in Central and Eastern Europe suggests, it may be non-voting, rather than populist protest voting, which could prove the real long-term threat to sustainability of the EU’s troubled democratic institutions.
Dr Sean Hanley
2 June 2014 More...

Starts: Jun 2, 2014 12:00:00 AM

Negotiating Religion 1

Publication date: Nov 24, 2011 4:50:18 PM

Start: Nov 23, 2011 12:00:00 AM
End: Nov 23, 2011 12:00:00 AM

 23 November 2011

Workshop 1:

European Legacies, European Challenges

23 November 2011

3-7pm

Chadwick LT G08
UCL Main Campus
WC1E 6BT

Negotiating Religion

Negotiating Religion: Inquiries into the History and Present of Religious Accommodation

In 2011-12, a series of four workshops will discuss the complex processes through which religious communities create or defend their place in a given commonwealth, both in history and in our world today.

The focus is on communities' ability to formulate and present their claims, to identify potential spokespeople and their addressees, to secure their institutions and assert their physical and political presence, as well as on the epistemological, political and social conditions facilitating or complicating processes of negotiation. The workshops thus intend to focus on the agency of both sides in processes of negotiation, broadly understood as all societal and political interactions that not only concern a religious community but directly involve it.

The main objective is to stimulate a debate about the complex relationship between religion and society. Throughout their history, European commonwealths have been shaped by religious identity, community, and conflict. Constitutions and legal systems to this very day are deeply affected by religious traditions. Secularization has reduced religious tension within Western societies. However, these find their spiritual and cultural identity challenged by communities marked by stronger religious commitment, notably communities belonging to the world of Islam. Instead of reducing present day conflicts to essentialised notions of religious community, the workshops aim to explore the impact of religious legacies in European history and to contribute to a more precise understanding of the role of the multilayered processes of moderation and negotiation in the shaping of contemporary societies. 

For information on the next upcoming workshop, see here.


Workshop 1: European Legacies, European Challenges

23 November 2011

This first workshop addressed the history of religious conflict and accommodation, and gauges the impact of religious skepticism and secularization in Europe.

After a keynote on the relationship of public reasoning and religious commitment, discussing the role of forgiveness in economic relations and the impact the notion of the journey of the soul has for setting health care priorities, four papers reflected on historical examples of religious communities and attitudes negotiating their place in state and society.

The concluding panel discussion engaged a group of outstanding experts and the public in a discussion on a more visible and proactive investigation of the relationship between religion and society at UCL.

PROGRAMME:

3 pm Welcome
  Prof David Price, UCL Vice-Provost (Research)
  Keynote:
  Prof Albert Weale FBA (UCL School of Public Policy):
Can There be a Public Reason of the Heart?
4 pm European Legacies, European Challenges
  Prof David d'Avray FBA (UCL History):
Religious and Secular Values - A Historical Sociology of the West
  Prof Benjamin Kaplan (UCL History):
Negotiating Religious Difference in Borderland Settings
  Dr François Guesnet (UCL Hebrew and Jewish Studies):
Speaking for Religious Minorities: Jews and Protestants in the 18th century
  Prof Helen A Hackett (UCL English):
Seventeenth-century English Catholics at home and abroad – the case of the Aston Thimelby circle
6pm Roundtable Discussion:
Envisioning Religion & Society at a Global University
  Prof Albert Weale FBA (UCL School of Public Policy)
  Dr Charis Boutieri (Theology and Religious Studies, King's College)
  Dr François Guesnet (UCL Hebrew and Jewish Studies)
  Chair: Dr Uta Staiger (UCL European Institute


Convener
:
Dr François Guesnet (UCL Hebrew and Jewish Studies)