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COMMENTS 

How come “intolerant” Poland is among European leaders in collecting data on hate crimes?

In Poland over the past ten years, there has been a creeping recognition of the need to combat hate crime. While intolerance remains an issue in this Central European country, developments in in the official response to targeted violence are evident. Nevertheless, it is unclear what motivated the authorities to address this issue. Piotr Godzisz, PhD candidate at UCL SSEES, explores what explains Poland’s leadership in this regard.
14 January 2016
Piotr Godzisz More...

Starts: Jan 14, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Maps in Films: the View from Ealing

In the website The Cine-Tourist, Roland-François Lack, Senior Lecturer in UCL’s Department of French, has created a repository for his research around cinema and place. Here he illustrates some connections between maps and films.
1 February 2016
Roland-François Lack More...

Starts: Feb 4, 2016 12:00:00 AM

How ISIS Rule and Mobilisation Matters for the Military Response to the Paris Attacks

Kristin Bakke, Senior Lecturer in Political Science looks at how air strikes may affect ISIS, given how ISIS rules and how it mobilises support and recruits fighters. Although air strikes might contribute to containing the group and its ability to rule, it is likely to fuel the narrative that fosters mobilisation. To the degree that there is a case for a military response against ISIS, it is, by itself, insufficient. More...

Starts: Dec 16, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Eurozone Crisis and the Democratic Deficit

Publication date: Nov 03, 2011 10:29 AM

Start: Oct 10, 2012 05:00 PM
End: Nov 29, 2012 09:00 PM

29 November 2012

When
29 Nov 2012, 5.45-7.15pm

Where
Medical Sciences & Anatomy Building
Medical Sciences 131 A V Hill LT
University College London
Gower Street
London WC1E 6BT


Eurozone Crisis

Eventbrite - Eurozone Crisis & the Democratic Deficit

There have been longstanding concerns regarding the democratic standards of the EU and its capacity to engage with citizens. This oft-invoked ‘democratic deficit’ specifically concerns the incomplete development of instruments of parliamentary democracy at the EU level, such as: the accountability of decision-making bodies to the electorate; party-political competition with rival programmes and ideologies; the capacity of public opinion-formation to influence policy development; and the balance between executive power and parliamentary oversight.

At all times hotly debated, these concerns have deepened as EU institutions have expanded their competences and moved into  policy areas directly affecting core areas associated with national sovereignty. Certain responsibilities in areas involving expertise or basic rights have long been delegated, albeit controversially, to agencies to a greater or lesser independent of direct government or electoral control (such as central banks and regulatory authorities). Yet increasingly, Europeanization and wider globalising trends, has led to policies that were previously  the exclusive competence of national governments (such as fiscal and social policies, or  the implications of non-discrimination on grounds of nationality), to be constrained by non-majoritarian institutions that are only partially and often very indirectly under domestic political control.

Arguably, these developments have contributed to the rising public disillusionment with established political systems at all levels, the upsurge of populist fringe parties, and new calls for the re-nationalisation of competences. Increasingly, the EU is criticised as a supposedly biased actor, dominated by certain state or economic actors, and imposing policies on Member States and citizens alike “from the outside”.

The panel on the 29th of November, part of a seminar series sponsored by the European Commission office in London, will address these issues from different policy maker/stakeholder perspectives. 

Panel:

Sir John Gieve Former Bank of England and Visiting Professor at UCL
Lord Roger Liddle
Chair of the Board Policy Network and Labour member of the UK House of Lords
David Babbs
Executive Director, 38 Degrees
Dr Colin Provos
Department of Political Science, UCL
Chair: John Peet
The Economist


This event will be followed by a drinks reception in the Print Room Cafe.

Generously supported by the European Commission Representation in the UK

European Commission Representation