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COMMENTS 

What precisely is the Greek government’s mandate?

Kira Gartzou, research assistant in European Studies, analyses the differences in views expressed by Syriza towards Europe, and in particular Germany, during its winning electoral campaign, and the views now portrayed in Syriza’s party newspaper since coming to power in January 2015. What implications may this have for the future of Greek negotiations with creditor institutions, and what is actually the mandate of the Greek government?
Dr. Kira Gartzou
25 June 2015 More...

Starts: Jun 25, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Extremism disenchanted: what role can education play?

Young people in the UK today who are attracted to extremism are typically well educated. Given the weaknesses of this ideology in terms of its use of history, internal coherence of arguments and moral standards, its success with many educated young people requires explanation. The explanation, according to Dr. Farid, is multifaceted but education has a big role to play in curbing the trend.
2 June 2015
Dr. Farid Panjwani More...

Starts: Jun 2, 2015 12:00:00 AM

The case for an EU referendum

Christopher Bickerton, lecturer in Politics at the University of Cambridge, discusses how how the impending EU referendum in the UK necessitates open and unbiased academic debate, and how British discussions of EU reform may reverberate across the European continent.
15 May 2015
Dr. Christopher Bickerton More...

Starts: May 15, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Global Corruption

Publication date: Nov 03, 2011 10:29 AM

Start: May 13, 2013 05:00 PM
End: May 13, 2013 09:00 PM

13 May 2013


When
13 May 2013, 5.00pm

Where
Anatomy G04 Gavin de Beer LT
Medical Sciences & Anatomy Building
Gower Street
London WC1E

To register, visit Eventbrite


Global Corruption

Laurence Cockcroft: Corruption is a key issue which relates to economic development, income distribution and the credibility of political institutions. LC will ask the question : why is corruption so prevalent after fifteen years of  international action, much of which has translated into legislation  and regulation at the national level ?  In response he will analyse the main drivers of corruption at the small scale and national level, including particularly the roles of political finance, organised crime and the local and international corporate sector.  He will identify the main roadblocks to making progress (including the roles of the shadow economy, secrecy jurisdictions and geo politics) and suggest that real progress depends on addressing these amongst other issues. He will show how the current agenda of the G8 and G20 covers some key corruption related questions, and will discuss how the far this is likely to translate into  practical action.

Laurence Cockcroft is the author of Global Corruption : Money, Power and Ethics in the Modern World (I. B Tauris  UK and Penn Press US, 2012)

Susan Rose-Ackerman (Yale): International Actors and the Promises and Pitfalls of Anti-Corruption Reform Policies to control corruption will always be controversial and contested, especially when anti-corruption measures are imposed or supported by international actors—most notably aid and lending bodies, global non-profits, or international treaty regimes.  Modern states face fundamental political/economic problems, and corruption can exacerbate these problems.  Reductions in corruption are part of the global focus on improving human well-being and government functioning. The talk will consider feasible options for international bodies operating under severe political and financial constraints.  Under some conditions, neither domestic governments nor donor representatives see benefits from documenting corruption and from taking concrete steps to reduce its impact.  Investors may share this reluctance.  Here is where independent groups and the media need to concentrate attention by prodding donors and governments to take corruption seriously. We also need more research that documents successes and failures of policy efforts.  Corruption is a complex phenomenon that is difficult to measure, but in recent years researchers have developed a number of clever strategies to measure corruption or its impact. Stronger links should be formed between aid projects and information provision so that governments can learn from others’ experiences.  The system of international dispute resolution should consider corruption and self-dealing.  Arbitrators are beginning to acknowledge that their decisions can affect the citizens of host countries—as well as the integrity of the international trade and investment regime.  Criminal prosecutions are likely to remain the province of domestic courts for the foreseeable future, but international bodies can do more to help develop criminal cases and to support reform of criminal justice systems.  Anti-corruption initiatives need to take a more holistic approach.  There appears to be too much specialization of function among international bodies, permitting corruption to flourish in the grey zones where no agency can act, or worse, where no one has an interest in acting.  


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With the support of the Lifelong Learning Programme of the European Union.