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COMMENTS 

Immigration deserves a proper, open debate.

In a letter to the Financial Times, UCL's Professor of EU Law Piet Eeckhout outlines his bemusement at the current discourse on immigration in the UK.
Prof Piet Eeckhout
3 December 2014

More...

Starts: Dec 9, 2014 12:00:00 AM

The Democratic Disconnect

In the eurozone, the EU needs greater legitimacy at the national level not only to secure space for domestic politics but also to secure respect for social and economic commitments over time.
Prof. Albert Weale
24 November 2014 More...

Starts: Nov 24, 2014 12:00:00 AM

Europe: Six decades of strife and controversy for UK

It's groundhog day in Britain, where the European Union is concerned. The context changes, but the basic issues do not.
Sir Stephen Wall
18 November 2014 More...

Starts: Nov 18, 2014 12:00:00 AM

Samuel Daniel's Tragedie of Cleopatra

Publication date: Jan 25, 2013 12:00 AM

Start: Mar 03, 2013 02:00 PM
End: Mar 03, 2013 09:00 PM

3 March 2013

When
3 March 2013, 2.00pm
(Seating 1.45pm)

Where
Goodenough College
Mecklenburgh Square
London WC1N 2AB 

Please visit Eventbrite to register


Cleopatra

Samuel Daniel’s Tragedie of Cleopatra (1594) is the first English drama about Cleopatra and a source for Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra. This production arises from the PhD research of Yasmin Arshad (UCL, English) and brings together a talented production team from a wide range of UCL departments.

The production will explore early modern attitudes to race and national identity. The play centres on tensions between Egypt and Rome and on a non-European heroine who is fascinatingly different from Shakespeare’s Cleopatra in her nobility and stoicism. It is a sequel to Mary Sidney’s translation of Robert Garnier’s Antonie, making it an English play about an Egyptian queen inspired by a translation from French of a neo-Senecan tragedy. As such it demonstrates that cultural dialogue across and beyond Europe was the engine of artistic and intellectual innovation in the early modern period. 

The production will also overturn the widespread perception that women did not participate in drama in Shakespeare’s time. Although female roles were taken by boys in commercial playhouses such as the Globe, Daniel’s play belongs to a genre (sometimes called ‘closet drama’) performed in country house settings with actors including women. Excitingly, Yasmin Arshad has discovered a portrait of a Jacobean lady in costume as Cleopatra, inscribed with lines from Daniel’s play.

By investigating the history of relations between performance, race, and gender in early modern Europe this production will enhance our understanding of these issues in the present.

This project is supported by UCL European Institute's call for proposals 2012-13