Welcome to the UCL European Institute, UCL's hub for research, collaboration and information on Europe and the European Union.

Contact us

16 Taviton St
London
WC1H 0BW
+44 (0) 207 679 8737
european.institute@ucl.ac.uk

How to find us >>

trans32.pngtrans32.pngtrans32.pngtrans32.png

COMMENTS 

Extremism disenchanted: what role can education play?

Young people in the UK today who are attracted to extremism are typically well educated. Given the weaknesses of this ideology in terms of its use of history, internal coherence of arguments and moral standards, its success with many educated young people requires explanation. The explanation, according to Dr. Farid, is multifaceted but education has a big role to play in curbing the trend.
2 June 2015
Dr. Farid Panjwani More...

Starts: Jun 2, 2015 12:00:00 AM

The case for an EU referendum

Christopher Bickerton, lecturer in Politics at the University of Cambridge, discusses how how the impending EU referendum in the UK necessitates open and unbiased academic debate, and how British discussions of EU reform may reverberate across the European continent.
15 May 2015
Dr. Christopher Bickerton More...

Starts: May 15, 2015 12:00:00 AM

How much closer are we to Brexit?

If the British general election was a shock to many in the UK, then it was equally so for the chancelleries across the European Union. As much as they had started to think about a British renegotiation and referendum, there has been a very strong sense that the election result would throw that out of the window. Any such thoughts are now firmly gone. This commentary explores the outcome of the British General Election and the implications for a British in-out EU referendum.
Dr Simon Usherwood
8 May 2015 More...

Starts: May 8, 2015 12:00:00 AM

Samuel Daniel's Tragedie of Cleopatra

Publication date: Jan 25, 2013 12:00 AM

Start: Mar 03, 2013 02:00 PM
End: Mar 03, 2013 09:00 PM

3 March 2013

When
3 March 2013, 2.00pm
(Seating 1.45pm)

Where
Goodenough College
Mecklenburgh Square
London WC1N 2AB 

Please visit Eventbrite to register


Cleopatra

Samuel Daniel’s Tragedie of Cleopatra (1594) is the first English drama about Cleopatra and a source for Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra. This production arises from the PhD research of Yasmin Arshad (UCL, English) and brings together a talented production team from a wide range of UCL departments.

The production will explore early modern attitudes to race and national identity. The play centres on tensions between Egypt and Rome and on a non-European heroine who is fascinatingly different from Shakespeare’s Cleopatra in her nobility and stoicism. It is a sequel to Mary Sidney’s translation of Robert Garnier’s Antonie, making it an English play about an Egyptian queen inspired by a translation from French of a neo-Senecan tragedy. As such it demonstrates that cultural dialogue across and beyond Europe was the engine of artistic and intellectual innovation in the early modern period. 

The production will also overturn the widespread perception that women did not participate in drama in Shakespeare’s time. Although female roles were taken by boys in commercial playhouses such as the Globe, Daniel’s play belongs to a genre (sometimes called ‘closet drama’) performed in country house settings with actors including women. Excitingly, Yasmin Arshad has discovered a portrait of a Jacobean lady in costume as Cleopatra, inscribed with lines from Daniel’s play.

By investigating the history of relations between performance, race, and gender in early modern Europe this production will enhance our understanding of these issues in the present.

This project is supported by UCL European Institute's call for proposals 2012-13