Welcome to the UCL European Institute, UCL's hub for research, collaboration and information on Europe and the European Union. We are part of the Institute of Advanced Studies.


Contact us

16 Taviton St
London
WC1H 0BW
+44 (0) 207 679 8737
european.institute@ucl.ac.uk

How to find us >>

trans32.pngtrans32.pngtrans32.pngtrans32.png

COMMENTS 

Does Eastern Europe have lessons for Brexit Britain

In the aftermath of the EU referendum a number of Central and South East Europeanists wrote blogs reflecting on possible parallels between Brexit and break-ups of multinational socialist states like Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia in early 1990s.
Sean Healy
1 August 2016
More...

Starts: Aug 1, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Hollande's response to the Nice massacre will please only the far right

On Thursday night, for the third time since January 2015, President François Hollande was faced with a mass murder on French soil. An ashen-faced Hollande, almost looking like a broken man, appeared on television on Friday at 4am and declared: “This is undoubtedly a terrorist attack; the whole of France is under the threat of an Islamic terrorist attack”.
Philippe Marlière
18 July 2016 More...

Starts: Jul 18, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Roman oratory and the EU referendum campaigns

In addition to marking a politically decisive moment in British history, the campaigns in advance of the referendum on the UK’s membership in the EU were exciting objects of study for Classicists in terms of the political use of oratory.
Gesine Manuwald
11 July 2016 More...

Starts: Jul 11, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Greek Tragedy's Renaissance Inflections

Publication date: Nov 13, 2013 04:48 PM

Start: Mar 12, 2014 12:00 AM

12 March 2014
A workshop on the reception of classical drama, the fate of Euripides' plays and Iphigenia at Aulis in early modern Europe.


When:

12 March 2014

Registration: Eventbrite

Where:

Room 307
SELCS Common Room
UCL Foster Court, Malet Place
London WC1E 7JG

 

A consideration of the early reception of Greek Tragedy in early modern Europe, bringing together classicists and early modernists, the event will include performances of short scenes from the earliest translation by an Englishwoman of a play from the Greek, Lady Jane Lumley's 1555 Iphigenia at Aulis. 

Speakers:
  • Roger Green (Glasgow), Iphigenia in Bordeaux: George Buchanan's Jephthes
  • Fiona Macintosh (Oxford), Tragedy and the feminine in the early modern period
  • Alison Findlay (Lancaster), ‘I have prepared all thinge redie for the sacrifice’: Lady Jane Lumley's Iphigenia at Aulis (c. 1555)
  • Kate Maltby (UCL), “The boldness of her mind”: how sharp was Lumley's Greek?
  • Emilia Wilton-Godberfforde (Cambridge), Racine’s Iphigènie

The Rose Theatre Company Cast and Crew will perform scenes and discuss Lumley’s play, followed by a reception at 6.30pm.

For full details, please visit the event webpage