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COMMENTS 

Immigration deserves a proper, open debate.

In a letter to the Financial Times, UCL's Professor of EU Law Piet Eeckhout outlines his bemusement at the current discourse on immigration in the UK.
Prof Piet Eeckhout
3 December 2014

More...

Starts: Dec 9, 2014 12:00:00 AM

The Democratic Disconnect

In the eurozone, the EU needs greater legitimacy at the national level not only to secure space for domestic politics but also to secure respect for social and economic commitments over time.
Prof. Albert Weale
24 November 2014 More...

Starts: Nov 24, 2014 12:00:00 AM

Europe: Six decades of strife and controversy for UK

It's groundhog day in Britain, where the European Union is concerned. The context changes, but the basic issues do not.
Sir Stephen Wall
18 November 2014 More...

Starts: Nov 18, 2014 12:00:00 AM

European Film Day 2014

Publication date: Oct 29, 2013 05:33 PM

Start: Feb 06, 2014 12:00 AM

6 February 2014
The European Film Day is an opportunity to enthuse young people about European languages and cultures through the medium of film.

When:

6 February 2014
See programme below for details

Where:

Bloomsbury Theatre
15 Gordon St 
London WC1H 0AH

Eventbrite - European Film Day 2014

Held at London’s ‘global university’, UCL, and screened in the Bloomsbury Theatre, the European Film Day is an opportunity to enthuse young people about European languages and cultures through the medium of film.

It offers teachers and students the opportunity to see original-version films (Spanish, French and German), with subtitles in English, in a full cinema setting and with an introduction delivered by UCL academics. 

More on the films below.


Details:

Day-time screenings FOR SCHOOLS ONLY

  • The Spanish film, Pan's Labyrinth/El Laberinto del Fauno (dir. Guillermo del Toro, 2006) is open to students in Year 10 and above and their teachers. 
  • The French film, The Class/Entre les Murs (dir. Laurent Cantet, 2008) is targeted specifically at Years 9-10 and above
  • UCL Teaching Fellows will run a workshop after each of the day-time screenings to allow a limited number of registered groups to discuss aspects of the country’s history, culture and politics as portrayed in each film, while exploring the medium of film itself.
  • Teaching materials for these two films will be made available to all those who register for the screenings.

Evening screening: open to schools and the general public

  • At 6pm, the German-language film Barbara (dir. Christian Petzold, 2012), PG-13, is screened in an open session.

For all screenings:

  • A UCL academic will give a 15 minute introduction to each film
  • All films are shown in V.O. with subtitles in English

Programme

Time Event
 9.30am Registration for Spanish Film
10.00am Academic introduction to the Film
10.15am

Pan's Labyrinth (El Laberinto del Fauno)
dir. Guillermo del Toro, 2006

V.O. with subtitles in English

12.15pm Lunch
12.30pm
Tour for Group 1 (Spanish film students)
12.45-2.15pm Workshop
2.15pm Tour for Group 1 (Spanish workshop students)
   
11.45am
Tour for Group 2 (French film students)
12.30pm Registration for French Film
1.00pm Introduction to the Film
1.15pm

The Class (Entre les Murs)
dir. Laurent Cantet, 2008

V.O. with subtitles in English

3.15pm Tea break
3.30-5pm Workshop
   
6.00pm

Barbara
dir. Christian Petzold, 2012

V.O. with subtitles in English


Films:

Spanish-language film: 
Pan's Labyrinth/El Laberinto del Fauno, dir. Guillermo del Toro, 2006

In post-civil war fascist Spain 1944, the bookish young stepdaughter of a sadistic army officer escapes into an eerie but captivating fantasy world. Ofelia travels with her pregnant and sick mother Carmen Vidal to the country to live with her stepfather, Captain Vidal, in an old mill. During the night, she meets a fairy who takes her to an old faun in the centre of the labyrinth. He tells her she's a princess, but must prove her royalty by surviving three gruesome tasks. If she fails, she will never prove herself to be a true princess and will never see her real father, the king, again.

French-language film:
The Class/Entre les Murs, dir. Laurent Cantet, 2008

Winner of the Palme d'Or at Cannes, this is an autobiographical film about a young teacher reaching out to a troubled class of underprivileged kids. François and his fellow teachers prepare for a new year at a high school in a tough neighbourhood. Cultures and attitudes often clash in the classroom, a microcosm of contemporary France. François’ classroom ethics are put to the test when his students begin to challenge his methods.

German-language film:
Barbara (dir. Christian Petzold, 2012)

Winner of the Silver Bear at the Berlin International Film Festival 2012, this drama of human and political dilemmas follows Barbara, a doctor working at the prestigious Charité hospital in the East Germany of 1980, as she is banished to a hospital in the provinces as a punishment for an application to emigrate to the west. There, while harassed by Stasi official Schütz and secretly planning her escape, Barbara appears also to captivate an idealistic and handsome colleague. Is he falling in love with her?  Is he another Stasi spy? Or both?