Welcome to the UCL European Institute, UCL's hub for research, collaboration and information on Europe and the European Union. We are part of the Institute of Advanced Studies.


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WC1H 0BW
+44 (0) 207 679 8737
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COMMENTS 

EU referendum: the view of a UCL clinician-scientist

John Martin, Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at UCL, argues that scientific advance relies on creativity, cooperation, and financing. To leave the EU would diminish all three, dimming the light of British science in the world and threatening the UK’s future economy. This piece is part of the UCL European Institute’s commissioning partnership with openDemocracy. For more on this topic, join the UCL European Institute for its high-level panel discussion EU Membership and UK Science on 12 May.
10 May 2016
John Martin
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Starts: May 10, 2016 12:00:00 AM

‘Eurofog’ of claim and counterclaim on EU membership and UK science

Graeme Reid, Professor of Science and Research Policy at UCL, recently advised a House of Lords inquiry on the impact of EU membership on UK  science and research. In this post, he discusses the inquiry’s main findings, both expected and unexpected. He also joins a high-level panel to discuss the topic at the UCL European Institute on 12 May 2016.
10 May 2016
Graeme Reid
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Starts: May 10, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Something rotten in the state of Czechia?

The Czech Republic has been in the news recently because of its politicians' somewhat quick Celtic campaign to rebrand the country to the world as ‘Czechia’. But among political scientists and businesspeople the country's name has long suffered worst damage than this.
5 May 2016
Dr Sean Hanley
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Starts: May 5, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Plus Ça Change: The Evolution of Public Support for European Integration Since 1952

Publication date: Nov 13, 2013 04:48 PM

Start: Mar 06, 2014 12:00 AM

6 March 2014
Christopher J. Anderson, Professor of Government at Cornell, on what Europeans have thought about the integration project and process since its inception.


When:

6 March 2014, 5.30pm

Registration

Where:

AV Hill Lecture Theatre
Medical Sciences Building
Malet Place
WC1E 6BT

UCL Department of Political Science Event

Despite a proliferation of analyses of public support for European integration, fundamental questions remain about what Europeans think about the integration project and process. This talk examines public opinion data since the genesis of the integration project to determine if there really are separable dimensions of support for Europe, whether public preferences for Europe become more structured as the integration process has evolved, and whether the trajectory of public support for integration reveals more stability or change. Analyses suggest that attitudes toward Europe reflect a single underlying dimension, and that the content of this dimension is stable over time. Moreover, statistical tests reveal that, over the long historical run, support for Europe is characterized by limited fluctuations around a stable mean in most countries.


Christopher J. Anderson, Professor of Government at Cornell, works at the intersections of political science, economics, and sociology. His research focuses on contextual models of human action. Such models view individuals as nested in a variety of social, economic, and political environments that shape and constrain their behavior.

In the areas of political economy and political sociology, he studies how differences in macro-political contexts across countries shape people’s cognition and action. He has long been interested in popular consent and inequality in democracies and has written on the popularity of governments, the legitimacy of political institutions, and the link between welfare states and citizen behavior. His current research projects in this area examine how welfare states shape people’s social and economic behavior and how host societies affect the propensity of immigrants to participate in politics. Anderson also works on the social science of sports, with a focus on the political economy of soccer.

Anderson has held appointments at several universities and business schools, including Oxford University’s Nuffield College and Northwestern University’s Kellogg Graduate School of Management. He is the recipient of a number of awards, including the American Political Science Association’s Heinz Eulau Award for the best article published in the American Political Science Review, the Best Article Award from the Journal of Politics, and the Emerging Scholar Award from the APSA Section on Elections, Public Opinion, and Voting Behavior. He has served as President of the American Political Science Association’s Section on European Politics and Society, and on the editorial boards of the American Journal of Political Science, Electoral Studies, European Union Politics, and the Journal of Politics.

A native of Germany, he studied at the University of Cologne, Virginia Tech, and Washington University in St.Louis, where he received his PhD.