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COMMENTS 

10 things you need to know about what will happen if Scotland votes yes

As the Scottish independence referendum draws closer the outcome is hard to predict. Both Westminster politicians and the wider public are asking what – in practical terms – would happen if the Scots were to vote Yes. Robert Hazell offers a 10-point overview of what the road to independence might look like.
Professor Robert Hazell
9 September 2014
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Starts: Sep 9, 2014 12:00:00 AM

The truth is, Scandinavia is neither heaven nor hell

The Nordic countries have received exceptionally good press in the UK - at least until earlier this year, when British travel writer and resident of Denmark, Michael Booth, claimed to dispel the of Scandinavia as the perfect place to live. Many are now confused. Is everything we believed about the social ideals of Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland a lie? Well, not entirely but we’re not all drunk serial killers either.
Dr Jakob Stougaard-Nielsen
19 August 2014 More...

Starts: Sep 8, 2014 12:00:00 AM

A Question of Trust

The age-old question of what holds our societies together re-emerges periodically, particularly in times of crisis. In a world ever more globalised and virtual, the answer is often cast in terms of "trust", with its pivotal role as regularly called upon as its health called into question. How has trust risen to this centrality, and is it all as straightforward as it seems?
Dr Uta Staiger
13 August 2014
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Starts: Aug 13, 2014 12:00:00 AM

Plus Ça Change: The Evolution of Public Support for European Integration Since 1952

Publication date: Nov 13, 2013 4:48:03 PM

Start: Mar 6, 2014 12:00:00 AM

6 March 2014
Christopher J. Anderson, Professor of Government at Cornell, on what Europeans have thought about the integration project and process since its inception.


When:

6 March 2014, 5.30pm

Registration

Where:

AV Hill Lecture Theatre
Medical Sciences Building
Malet Place
WC1E 6BT

UCL Department of Political Science Event

Despite a proliferation of analyses of public support for European integration, fundamental questions remain about what Europeans think about the integration project and process. This talk examines public opinion data since the genesis of the integration project to determine if there really are separable dimensions of support for Europe, whether public preferences for Europe become more structured as the integration process has evolved, and whether the trajectory of public support for integration reveals more stability or change. Analyses suggest that attitudes toward Europe reflect a single underlying dimension, and that the content of this dimension is stable over time. Moreover, statistical tests reveal that, over the long historical run, support for Europe is characterized by limited fluctuations around a stable mean in most countries.


Christopher J. Anderson, Professor of Government at Cornell, works at the intersections of political science, economics, and sociology. His research focuses on contextual models of human action. Such models view individuals as nested in a variety of social, economic, and political environments that shape and constrain their behavior.

In the areas of political economy and political sociology, he studies how differences in macro-political contexts across countries shape people’s cognition and action. He has long been interested in popular consent and inequality in democracies and has written on the popularity of governments, the legitimacy of political institutions, and the link between welfare states and citizen behavior. His current research projects in this area examine how welfare states shape people’s social and economic behavior and how host societies affect the propensity of immigrants to participate in politics. Anderson also works on the social science of sports, with a focus on the political economy of soccer.

Anderson has held appointments at several universities and business schools, including Oxford University’s Nuffield College and Northwestern University’s Kellogg Graduate School of Management. He is the recipient of a number of awards, including the American Political Science Association’s Heinz Eulau Award for the best article published in the American Political Science Review, the Best Article Award from the Journal of Politics, and the Emerging Scholar Award from the APSA Section on Elections, Public Opinion, and Voting Behavior. He has served as President of the American Political Science Association’s Section on European Politics and Society, and on the editorial boards of the American Journal of Political Science, Electoral Studies, European Union Politics, and the Journal of Politics.

A native of Germany, he studied at the University of Cologne, Virginia Tech, and Washington University in St.Louis, where he received his PhD.