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Oligarch Vlad Plahotniuc learns to consolidate authoritarianism in Moldova

Publication date:

Start: Jun 7, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Moldova

A recent and ongoing move towards authoritarianism in Moldova is a case of authoritarian learning, argues Stephen Hall, PhD student at UCL SSEES. The diminishing of political alternatives to the Democratic Party of Moldova has increased the power of Oligarch Vlad Plahotniuc and could lead to a stand-off with the EU in the future.
7 June 2016
Stephen Hall

Lies, Damn Lies and Leave.EU Leaflets

Publication date:

Start: Jun 9, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Brexit Muffins

As the Brexit campaign heats up, many of us are receiving leaflets urging us to vote either “in” or “out”. Whilst it is to be expected that each camp will attempt to frame the argument in a way that favours its cause, the Leave.EU leaflet makes claims that are clearly misleading. UCL academics Randoph Bruno, Filipa Figuiera and Jan Kubik set the record straight.
9 June 2016
Randoph Bruno, Filipa Figueira and Jan Kubik

Undecided on the referendum? These are the three questions to ask yourself in the voting booth

Publication date:

Start: Jun 16, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Undecided on the referendum?

If there is one thing people can agree on as they prepare to vote on the UK’s EU membership: comprehensive, comprehensible and trustworthy information is in short supply. Every day, the quality of the debate sinks to a new low – yet the stakes are as high as ever. How, then, are you supposed to make your decision on June 23? What questions should you ask yourself when you enter the polling booth?
16 June 2016
Uta Staiger

The price of solidarity: is Brexit worth it?

Publication date:

Start: Jun 23, 2016 12:00:00 AM

The price of solidarity: is Brexit worth it?

A misunderstanding of history and of historical time has put European solidarity on the chopping block. Think carefully before allowing the axe to swing, pleads Jan Kubik, Director of the School of Slavonic & East European Studies at UCL.
23 June 2016
Jan Kubik

The heart of the matter: passion, politics and the EU referendum

Publication date:

Start: Jun 23, 2016 12:00:00 AM

The heart of the matter: passion, politics and the EU referendum

Both Leave and Remain have appealed to voters’ guts to the extent that reason itself has become suspicious. Emotions will rule the day on 23 June, but at what cost?
23 June 2016
Uta Staiger

It's Brexit.

Publication date:

Start: Jun 27, 2016 12:00:00 AM

A first round of reactions from UCL staff to the EU referendum results.
24 June 2016

Tim Beasley-Murray, UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies
To understand one rather local, UCL facet of the EU referendum, consider this image: if you had walked into the UCL quad a few weeks back, in the midst of referendum campaign poisoned by xenophobic and racist discourse about migrants, and if you had looked up to the flagpole on top of the main UCL building, you would have seen a curious silver banner. This banner was an art project by UCL Slade students, “The New European Flag”, made out of the foil blankets used to drape refugees from Syria who wade ashore on the Greek of island of Lesbos. Raising the flag, its makers tell us, was “an attempt to create and disseminate a powerful social and humanitarian message marked by solidarity". While the flag was raised on 9 June, moreover, a string quartet and singer performed Beethoven’s ‘Ode to Joy’. Walking into the quad today, I half expected to see the New European Flag at half-mast. The results of the referendum tell us that many who voted Remain were predominantly young and educated and that their strongholds were the University cities of London, Bristol, Oxford and Cambridge, Edinburgh and Exeter: experts, the liberal elite. The tragedy of the referendum is that many of those who voted out - those who rightly feel that they get a raw deal in modern Britain - were encouraged to do so by another elite: self-serving, mendacious, and illiberal. Remain voters feel upset, betrayed, and angry. But many of them were those who most obviously benefitted from the EU and its free movement for study and employment. This liberal elite will survive and most likely still prosper. Many of those who voted Leave, if the experts are right, will suffer. As the post-referendum dust settles, the liberal elite on the Remain side needs to move beyond mourning and consider the part that it can play in creating a society of productive solidarity - not only with refugees from Syria, but also with those in the shires, small towns and post-industrial cities of Britain.

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