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UCL European Institute

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16 Taviton St
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WC1H 0BW
+44 (0) 207 679 8737
european.institute@ucl.ac.uk

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COMMENTS 

From Indyref to Indignados: how passions and politics mix

As Scotland heads to the polls, this piece discusses the extent to which emotions have arrived at the heart of contemporary politics – yet we still hesitate to admit it. Emotions can neither be banished nor ignored when we discuss what constitutes political communities, how political decisions should be made and political action springs into being. Yet to embrace the rise of emotional politics without acknowledging how intimately it is and should be entangled with reason equally risks undermining just political action.
Dr Uta Staiger
18 September 2014
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Starts: Sep 18, 2014 12:00:00 AM

10 things you need to know about what will happen if Scotland votes yes

As the Scottish independence referendum draws closer the outcome is hard to predict. Both Westminster politicians and the wider public are asking what – in practical terms – would happen if the Scots were to vote Yes. Robert Hazell offers a 10-point overview of what the road to independence might look like.
Professor Robert Hazell
9 September 2014
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Starts: Sep 9, 2014 12:00:00 AM

The truth is, Scandinavia is neither heaven nor hell

The Nordic countries have received exceptionally good press in the UK - at least until earlier this year, when British travel writer and resident of Denmark, Michael Booth, claimed to dispel the of Scandinavia as the perfect place to live. Many are now confused. Is everything we believed about the social ideals of Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland a lie? Well, not entirely but we’re not all drunk serial killers either.
Dr Jakob Stougaard-Nielsen
19 August 2014 More...

Starts: Sep 8, 2014 12:00:00 AM

UCL European Institute

UCL Strategy


GC

UCL's outlook recognises the importance of Europe and the EU to the university. The UCL Europe Strategy addresses how UCL can strengthen its role as one of the leading research-intensive universities in the European Union. The UCL Research Strategy and its associated Grand Challenges programme, in turn, aim to enhance the impact and recognition of UCL’s research on Europe and the EU.

UCL's Europe Strategy

The UCL Europe Strategy recognises that Europe is an expanding market for higher education, research and mobility, as well as a source for research funding. The key vision of the strategy is for UCL to strengthen its role in both the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) and the European Research Area (ERA).

In order to achieve this, the strategy has been designed to:

  • further the recognition of UCL as one of Europe’s leading centres for academic research and higher education
  • raise awareness of UCL as a European HEI and encourage greater mobility of students and staff between UCL and European HEIs
  • enlist from European HEIs, public bodies and commercial organisations support for UCL’s Grand Challenges.

The strategy (UCL users can download it here) was developed by the Pro-Provost for Europe, Professor Mike Wilson. The new Pro-Provost for Europe is Professor Peter Delves. Sitting also on the executive board of the European Institute, Mike Wilson works closely with us to develop key institutional alliances for the Institute and advise on European HEI contacts.

UCL Research Strategy & Grand Challenges

UCL has drawn up a responsive, flexible and evidence-based Research Strategy (pdf) grounded on the precepts of innovation and managed risk. This strategy aims to enable UCL to deliver excellence and generate global impact in a sustainable manner. It requires an intensification of the integration, synthesis and outreach of our research.

Therefore, UCL has prioritised areas in which such interdisciplinary partnerships can thrive and the academic, public and policy impact of UCL’s research may be enhanced. Called the Grand Challenges, they are new, cross-college programmes aiming to:

  • increase and strengthen research on complex and systemic challenges by working across and beyond traditional disciplines
  • form alliances and collaborations, across multiple disciplines, focused on issues of global significance
  • bring the expertise and analysis of these issues into public fora to engage funding agencies, opinion-makers and legislators
  • realise this vision in strategic partnership with other world-class universities, local and national governmental bodies, non-governmental organisations, the NHS, funding bodies and charities.

The European Institute forms part of this investment. For more information, see Grand Challenges.