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Public Seminars

Global Disability Research Group Seminar Series

focusing on cross-disciplinary global disability research.
To join the mailing list for this seminar series please e-mail your details to Ellie Cole.

Global Health (IGH) Symposia

Members of the department contribute to IGH public meetings which bring together expertise on global health issues from all faculties within UCL.
Contact: Sarah Ball, Tel: (internal x82 72 2352)

2010 Seminar Series

Speaker: Dr Martin O'Flaherty, University of Liverpool

Title: 'The Flattening of Coronary Heart Disease Mortality rates: Trends are not set in stone'

Date & Time: Friday 22 October - 1pm-2pm

Venue: G37 & G38

Abstract:
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the leading global causes of morbidity and mortality. Extensive knowledge of causes and treatment suggests that the disease could be substantially reduced to a point far below current mass occurrence. The decline in CVD mortality rates since the 60s represents one of the most remarkable epidemiological phenomenon. However, this decline may be now in jeopardy. Using a trend analysis technique that allows to identify points in time with different rate of change coronary heart disease mortality rates seem to slow its rate of decline in young adults in some countries, like England and Wales, the US and Australia, Also,  Scottish coronary heart disease mortality trends show this “flattening” of the mortality trends, but  probably only happen in young deprived adults. These results are helping us to see these mortality trends as a very dynamic phenomenon, perhaps operating in a shorter timescale than previously thought. Although these changes are happening in an undesirable direction, the fast responsiveness of mortality trends to change in disease determinants suggests that public health interventions might show effectiveness on shorter time scales. 

Martin O'Flaherty is an Argentine physician interested in cardiovascular epidemiology and in using a modelling approach to inform the decision making process in healthcare. He is a researcher in several projects aimed to refine, extend and improve the usability of the IMPACT Coronary Heart Disease Policy model , led by Prof. Simon Capewell. Currently the model is being implemented in Canada, Spain, Poland, Tunisia, Palestine, Syria and Turkey. He is also working in describing and understanding current trends in CVD mortality globally.

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