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Highlights

Women in Renaissance Drama: Lady Anne Clifford and Cleopatra at Knole

Talk and Performance

Monday 23 June, 7-8.30pm

Adult £10, concessions £8. 

Book on: 01732 450 175 or at 
http://www.stagsevenoaks.co.uk/whats-on/23-Jun-2014/

Although in the public playhouses of Shakespeare’s time female roles were played by boys, awareness is growing of the participation of women themselves in early modern drama. Much of this took place at great country houses like Knole in Kent, home of Lady Anne Clifford. Come and hear lecturers from University College London explore Clifford's connection with Samuel Daniel's Tragedie of Cleopatra, while actors recreate scenes from the play.

Black Legend

The Black Legend is the perception/theory that Spaniards were especially tyrannical, cruel, intolerant, lustful and greedy. These powerful stereotypes prevent an accurate understanding of early modern and even contemporary Spain. This project seeks to study the Black Legend as an early modern cultural dialogue, one in which Spanish intellectuals saw foreign prejudices as challenges that they needed to answer. We will approach the Black Legend from an interdisciplinary perspective, combining literary studies with theories on nation building, propaganda, and identity formation in the period. In particular, we examine how the Black Legend influenced Spain's self-conception during the Golden Age: how did Golden Age Spanish writers receive these ideas and how did they use theatre in particular to respond to them, how did commercial and court plays contribute to the process of nation building, and how did a nation like Spain, adapt, adopt and appropriate foreign perceptions to reshape its own self-image?