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Mary Sidney

Specimens of Poetesses

Paul Salzman (La Trobe), Editing early modern women: Alexander Dyce's Specimens of British Poetesses (1825) More...

Starts: May 3, 2016 5:00:00 PM

Highlights

Specimens of Poetesses

Tuesday 3rd May 2016, 5 - 7pm
Location: Foster Court 307
Mary Sidney

Paul Salzman (La Trobe), Editing early modern women: Alexander Dyce's Specimens of British Poetesses (1825)

Abstract:

In 1825 Alexander Dyce published a remarkable anthology of poetry by women writers from Juliana Berners to L. E. Landon. The forty or so writers in the collection who wrote prior to the mid eighteenth century form an impressively varied collection. In this paper I examine the sources Dyce used and the reasoning behind the anthology as a whole. Dyce’s volume not only exemplifies the remarkably catholic taste of a nineteenth century editor, but it also serves as a paradigm for how the transmission of texts by early modern women continued into the nineteenth century, and intersected with something of a golden age for the editing of Renaissance literature in general. The anthology can as well be seen as an intervention in the way that contemporary women’s poetry was being read during Romanticism and its aftermath. I will consider how significant this selection of women’s poetry was for Dyce’s other editorial activities, and how his volume related to other nineteenth-century editorial projects.

The Centre's First Edited Volume

Edited by Professor Helen Hackett, a collection of essays on the theme of early modern exchanges has just been published by Ashgate. See advert...



Black Legend

The Black Legend is the perception/theory that Spaniards were especially tyrannical, cruel, intolerant, lustful and greedy. These powerful stereotypes prevent an accurate understanding of early modern and even contemporary Spain. This project seeks to study the Black Legend as an early modern cultural dialogue, one in which Spanish intellectuals saw foreign prejudices as challenges that they needed to answer. We will approach the Black Legend from an interdisciplinary perspective, combining literary studies with theories on nation building, propaganda, and identity formation in the period. In particular, we examine how the Black Legend influenced Spain's self-conception during the Golden Age: how did Golden Age Spanish writers receive these ideas and how did they use theatre in particular to respond to them, how did commercial and court plays contribute to the process of nation building, and how did a nation like Spain, adapt, adopt and appropriate foreign perceptions to reshape its own self-image?