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Forthcoming Events

Decorative Capital Selection

Mary I (1516-1558). A Conference in her 500th Anniversary Year

England’s first Queen regnant, Mary I, the daughter of King Henry VIII and Queen Catherine of Aragon, was born on 18 February 1516, at the Palace of Placentia in Greenwich. The aim of this conference is to bring together scholars doing new work on Queen Mary herself, her joint reign with her husband, King Philip of Spain (1554-1558), and on England’s place in Europe and the rest of the world during her reign. More...

Starts: Sep 30, 2016 10:00:00 AM

Highlights

Specimens of Poetesses

Tuesday 3rd May 2016, 5 - 7pm
Location: Foster Court 307
Mary Sidney

Paul Salzman (La Trobe), Editing early modern women: Alexander Dyce's Specimens of British Poetesses (1825)

Abstract:

In 1825 Alexander Dyce published a remarkable anthology of poetry by women writers from Juliana Berners to L. E. Landon. The forty or so writers in the collection who wrote prior to the mid eighteenth century form an impressively varied collection. In this paper I examine the sources Dyce used and the reasoning behind the anthology as a whole. Dyce’s volume not only exemplifies the remarkably catholic taste of a nineteenth century editor, but it also serves as a paradigm for how the transmission of texts by early modern women continued into the nineteenth century, and intersected with something of a golden age for the editing of Renaissance literature in general. The anthology can as well be seen as an intervention in the way that contemporary women’s poetry was being read during Romanticism and its aftermath. I will consider how significant this selection of women’s poetry was for Dyce’s other editorial activities, and how his volume related to other nineteenth-century editorial projects.

The Centre's First Edited Volume

Edited by Professor Helen Hackett, a collection of essays on the theme of early modern exchanges has just been published by Ashgate. See advert...



Big History

Publication date: Feb 12, 2014 11:33 AM

Start: Apr 28, 2014 05:00 PM

Location: Anatomy G29. JZ Young Lecture Theatre, UCL, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT

Global Crisis
  • Geoffrey Parker (Ohio State University), How not to write a global history of the 17th century
  • Respondents: Jonathan Holmes (UCL Geography) and Axel Korner (UCL History)

Held in conjunction with the Centre for Transnational History as part of their annual lecture series and the Centre for Research into the Dynamics of Civilization. Generously supported by the Grand Challenge of Intercultural Interaction.


In this lecture, Geoffrey Parker, Andreas Dorpalen Professor of History at The Ohio State University, will discuss his prize-winning book Global Crisis: war, climate change and catastrophe in the seventeenth century (Yale University Press, 2013), which traces the consequences for civilizations around the globe of the 17th century's 'Little Ice Age', when perhaps a third of the global human population perished. It will reflect on the challenges of writing 'big history' and what lessons if any can be learned from this spectacular early modern example of the most pressing problem facing the world today, climate change.