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Mary Sidney

Specimens of Poetesses

Paul Salzman (La Trobe), Editing early modern women: Alexander Dyce's Specimens of British Poetesses (1825) More...

Starts: May 3, 2016 5:00:00 PM

Highlights

Specimens of Poetesses

Tuesday 3rd May 2016, 5 - 7pm
Location: Foster Court 307
Mary Sidney

Paul Salzman (La Trobe), Editing early modern women: Alexander Dyce's Specimens of British Poetesses (1825)

Abstract:

In 1825 Alexander Dyce published a remarkable anthology of poetry by women writers from Juliana Berners to L. E. Landon. The forty or so writers in the collection who wrote prior to the mid eighteenth century form an impressively varied collection. In this paper I examine the sources Dyce used and the reasoning behind the anthology as a whole. Dyce’s volume not only exemplifies the remarkably catholic taste of a nineteenth century editor, but it also serves as a paradigm for how the transmission of texts by early modern women continued into the nineteenth century, and intersected with something of a golden age for the editing of Renaissance literature in general. The anthology can as well be seen as an intervention in the way that contemporary women’s poetry was being read during Romanticism and its aftermath. I will consider how significant this selection of women’s poetry was for Dyce’s other editorial activities, and how his volume related to other nineteenth-century editorial projects.

The Centre's First Edited Volume

Edited by Professor Helen Hackett, a collection of essays on the theme of early modern exchanges has just been published by Ashgate. See advert...



Assessment

All assessed work at MA level is double marked by two members of staff. In addition, an external examiner reviews the marking process and scrutinizes a selection of assessed coursework and dissertations. The Board of Examiners meets in late October or early November to decide the final awards.

Submissions deadlines for assessed work and means of submission will vary slightly across different departments, so please check with the relevant course tutor or postgraduate administrator to see when your coursework essays are due. The Early Modern Studies programme follows the deadlines set in the School of European Languages, Cultures and Society.

Details on marking criteria, penalties for late submission, plagiarism and the scheme of award are all available in the:

Scheme of Award

The MA in Early Modern Studies comprises three compulsory elements: the core course Early Modern Exchanges: Methods, Histories, Cultures worth 30 credits, the Dissertation worth 90 credits and optional courses to a total of 60 credits.

Pass: In order to achieve a pass candidates must achieve an overall mark of at least 50% and have achieved a minimum of 50% in the dissertation. The Board of Examiners may allow the possibility of a condoned failure in one or more elements provided that the mark achieved is at least 40%, the element in question is not the dissertation, and the percentage of the condoned failure does not exceed 25% of the total weighting of the elements of assessment.

Merit: the Board of Examiners will award a merit where the overall mark is 60 or greater, the mark for the dissertation is 65 or greater, there are no marks below 50 in any component.

Distinction: the Board of Examiners will award a distinction where in addition to meeting the requirement of achieving 50% or above in all elements of the programme at the first attempt, the overall average mark and dissertation are 70% or more.