Comparing the programmes

     

What is the difference between the programmes?

The programmes are of the same academic standard and we apply the same admissions criteria

  MSc Economic Policy MSc Economics
Coverage
Mainly applied: 4 out of the 7 courses are applied and the three core courses are more slanted towards applied material Mainly core: 5 or 6 out of the 7 courses cover core, mainly theoretical material, and 1 or 2 can be applied
Options choice
3 or 4 options from List A: Applied; 1 or 2 from List P: Policy 2 or 3 options from List C: Advanced Core; 1 or 2 from List A: Applied.
Common elements
The Research methods course and the dissertation The Research methods course and the dissertation

Which programmes should I take?

Graduates from both programmes go on to do PhDs and work in a whole range of roles in central banks, policy institutions, and the public and private sectors.  See the MSc Economics and MSc Economic Policy student profile pages for details.


Which programme you choose is a matter of taste.  If you prefer applying economics to practical questions, the MSc Economic Policy may be for you.  If you prefer theory, consider the MSc Economics. A recent student described the difference as ‘One of them will teach you to make a car, the other to drive it’


Students from both programmes go on to further research, but if you intend to do a PhD at a top institution (for example UCL, LSE, Oxford, UPF, top US schools) we recommend you take the MSc Economics.  This is because the first year of such PhDs consist of courses on core material so the more core material you have covered beforehand the better. 

Since we apply the same admissions criteria to both programmes, we allow students to switch between programmes during the first four weeks of the academic year.