2017-02-Fox

Study of the Glacial Erosion in the Antarctic Peninsula.

The topographic evolution in Antarctica is vital to accurately reconstruct past glaciers, their sensitivity to climate change, and their contribution to sea level. I will be travelling to the Antarctic Peninsula to collect samples that I can use to measure the long-term pattern and physical processes of glacial erosion.
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2017-01-Stroeve-Arctic

The Changing Arctic.

Prof. Julienne Stroeve participated in two international Arctic events during January, ArcticBaseCamp, a side meeting held in Davos, Switzerland during the World Economic Forum (WEF), and the Annual Arctic Frontiers meeting in Tromso, Norway. Both meetings brought together scientists, policy makers and industry to discuss the changing Arctic. At ArcticBaseCamp in Davos, a team of Arctic scientists presented state-of-the-art Arctic research to the world’s most powerful leaders. Prof. Julienne Stroeve from UCL delivered a keynote on the fate of Arctic sea ice. This talk was followed by presentations from former US vice president Al Gore and Christiana Figueres, the former Executive Secretary the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The event was well attended by media and foreign leaders and plans are being made to include the event at next years WEF. More...

News from the Earth Sciences

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Precambrian Research Group


The Precambrian is the informal name for the first 90% of Earth history during which life began its incredibly long journey towards biological complexity. 


This journey culminated in the appearance and diversification of animals between about 750 and 540 million years ago. Sedimentary rocks become increasingly scarce the further back in time one looks. For this reason, Precambrian studies are multidisciplinary by necessity, piecing together clues from a range of fields: geochemistry, palaeobiology, biochemistry, sedimentology, genetics and a range of earth system models (atmospheric, ocean circulation, climate and biogeochemical).

Our research group primarily uses the chemical, mineral and isotopic composition of sedimentary rocks to reconstruct earth system evolution during the two billion year interval from the end of the Archaean Eon (about 2500 million years ago) to the beginning of the Phanerozoic Eon (about 540 million years ago). During this Proterozoic Eon, extraordinary perturbations occurred to our planet’s surface environment. Some disturbances were extreme but transient, such as the ‘Snowball Earth’ intervals of global glaciation. Others caused irreversible changes that shaped the modern earth system, such as the ‘Great Oxidation Event’ and the ‘Neoproterozoic Oxygenation Event’ without which we would not be here today.