MSc in Global Management natural Resources

MSc in Global Management of Natural Resources

The program will prepare the future leaders in the management of the natural resources value chain across the globe. The successful graduate from this program will be well versed in all aspects of the energy and natural resources industries, will be an effective communicator, will have a strong background in Earth Science and Engineering, will be aware of social responsibilities, will operate within international constraints and opportunities, and will have strong managerial skills. More...

Philip Pogge von Standmann

Life exploded on Earth after slow rise of oxygen

It took 100 million years for oxygen levels in the oceans and atmosphere to increase to the level that allowed the explosion of animal life on Earth about 600 million years ago, according to study funded by the Natural Environment Research Council. Before now it was not known how quickly Earth’s oceans and atmosphere became oxygenated and if animal life expanded before or after oxygen levels rose.
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Precambrian Research Group


The Precambrian is the informal name for the first 90% of Earth history during which life began its incredibly long journey towards biological complexity. 


This journey culminated in the appearance and diversification of animals between about 750 and 540 million years ago. Sedimentary rocks become increasingly scarce the further back in time one looks. For this reason, Precambrian studies are multidisciplinary by necessity, piecing together clues from a range of fields: geochemistry, palaeobiology, biochemistry, sedimentology, genetics and a range of earth system models (atmospheric, ocean circulation, climate and biogeochemical).

Our research group primarily uses the chemical, mineral and isotopic composition of sedimentary rocks to reconstruct earth system evolution during the two billion year interval from the end of the Archaean Eon (about 2500 million years ago) to the beginning of the Phanerozoic Eon (about 540 million years ago). During this Proterozoic Eon, extraordinary perturbations occurred to our planet’s surface environment. Some disturbances were extreme but transient, such as the ‘Snowball Earth’ intervals of global glaciation. Others caused irreversible changes that shaped the modern earth system, such as the ‘Great Oxidation Event’ and the ‘Neoproterozoic Oxygenation Event’ without which we would not be here today.