2015-02-19

Postgraduate Taught Prize Winner 2014

In her response to being awarded the MAPS Faculty prize, Lara stated: “I am both thrilled and stunned to receive this prize. I have thoroughly enjoyed my time at the UCL Hazard Centre and would like to express my gratitude to the staff and fellow students for making it such a great experience. My MSc research project was centred on risk communication during a volcanic emergency and how interdisciplinary methods can be applied to increase the likelihood of successful translation of physical science into an effective emergency response. This is a critical area of applied volcanology as misunderstandings between scientists, emergency managers and the media can transform an emergency into disaster. I would especially like to thank my supervisors for all of their time, guidance and support. I’m excited to be collaborating with them on a paper in the future.” More...

Barnard

Prof Tom Barnard

Professor Tom Barnard, who died earlier this year (26th Jan. 2015), was a UCL graduate, and after service in World War II was appointed in 1946 as an Assistant Lecturer in Micropalaeontology at UCL. He was promoted to Professor in 1963, and retired from UCL in 1982.
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News from the Earth Sciences

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Precambrian Research Group


The Precambrian is the informal name for the first 90% of Earth history during which life began its incredibly long journey towards biological complexity. 


This journey culminated in the appearance and diversification of animals between about 750 and 540 million years ago. Sedimentary rocks become increasingly scarce the further back in time one looks. For this reason, Precambrian studies are multidisciplinary by necessity, piecing together clues from a range of fields: geochemistry, palaeobiology, biochemistry, sedimentology, genetics and a range of earth system models (atmospheric, ocean circulation, climate and biogeochemical).

Our research group primarily uses the chemical, mineral and isotopic composition of sedimentary rocks to reconstruct earth system evolution during the two billion year interval from the end of the Archaean Eon (about 2500 million years ago) to the beginning of the Phanerozoic Eon (about 540 million years ago). During this Proterozoic Eon, extraordinary perturbations occurred to our planet’s surface environment. Some disturbances were extreme but transient, such as the ‘Snowball Earth’ intervals of global glaciation. Others caused irreversible changes that shaped the modern earth system, such as the ‘Great Oxidation Event’ and the ‘Neoproterozoic Oxygenation Event’ without which we would not be here today.