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2017-01-Sammonds

Microdynamics of Ice.

Prof Peter Sammonds and Colleagues compiled and edited the theme issue of “Microdynamics of ice” published by the Philosophical transaction of the Royal Society A. This theme issue highlights some of the recent advances in the observations, analyses, theories, modelling and interpretation of ice microstructures and micro-deformation mechanisms. Among the contributors are @ES_UCL past and present researchers: Daniel L. Feltham, Peter M. Grindrod, Daniel C. Hatton, Ben Lishman, Ceri A. Middleton, Alexandra Seymour-Pierce. More...

2017-01- Dobson

Prof David Dobson will be the first UCL Scientist in Residence at the Slade School of Art.

Congratulations to David Dobson, Professor of Earth Materials on his new appointment as the first  Scientist in Residence at the UCL Slade School of Art. Professor Dobson will be based in the Slade School of Fine Art for one year from January 2017. More...

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Deep-Water Research

The Ainsa Deepwater Channel Project, Spanish Pyrenees


An Integrated Outcrop Study: Project Manager: Professor Kevin T. Pickering


Introduction to the Ainsa Channel System


The Ainsa Channel System, south-central Pyrenees, occurs in the oldest part of the Campodarbe Group, and it is of Upper Eocene age. The Ainsa Channel Complex is per- haps the most famous of the submarine channel outcrops within Western Europe. The Ainsa channels consist of two principal channel complexes (Ainsa I and Ainsa II) which are separated by thin- and very thin-bedded sandy turbidites and marls. The Ainsa I Channel Complex is an example of an erosional-depositional system. The Ainsa II Chan- nel Complex contains significant erosional cut-downs, with infill of essentially non- erosive sandy facies. The channel dimensions are at a seismic scale.