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2015-02-19

Postgraduate Taught Prize Winner 2014

In her response to being awarded the MAPS Faculty prize, Lara stated: “I am both thrilled and stunned to receive this prize. I have thoroughly enjoyed my time at the UCL Hazard Centre and would like to express my gratitude to the staff and fellow students for making it such a great experience. My MSc research project was centred on risk communication during a volcanic emergency and how interdisciplinary methods can be applied to increase the likelihood of successful translation of physical science into an effective emergency response. This is a critical area of applied volcanology as misunderstandings between scientists, emergency managers and the media can transform an emergency into disaster. I would especially like to thank my supervisors for all of their time, guidance and support. I’m excited to be collaborating with them on a paper in the future.” More...

Barnard

Prof Tom Barnard

Professor Tom Barnard, who died earlier this year (26th Jan. 2015), was a UCL graduate, and after service in World War II was appointed in 1946 as an Assistant Lecturer in Micropalaeontology at UCL. He was promoted to Professor in 1963, and retired from UCL in 1982.
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Deep-Water Research

The Ainsa Deepwater Channel Project, Spanish Pyrenees


An Integrated Outcrop Study: Project Manager: Professor Kevin T. Pickering


Introduction to the Ainsa Channel System


The Ainsa Channel System, south-central Pyrenees, occurs in the oldest part of the Campodarbe Group, and it is of Upper Eocene age. The Ainsa Channel Complex is per- haps the most famous of the submarine channel outcrops within Western Europe. The Ainsa channels consist of two principal channel complexes (Ainsa I and Ainsa II) which are separated by thin- and very thin-bedded sandy turbidites and marls. The Ainsa I Channel Complex is an example of an erosional-depositional system. The Ainsa II Chan- nel Complex contains significant erosional cut-downs, with infill of essentially non- erosive sandy facies. The channel dimensions are at a seismic scale.