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2017-02-Fox

Study of the Glacial Erosion in the Antarctic Peninsula.

The topographic evolution in Antarctica is vital to accurately reconstruct past glaciers, their sensitivity to climate change, and their contribution to sea level. I will be travelling to the Antarctic Peninsula to collect samples that I can use to measure the long-term pattern and physical processes of glacial erosion.
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2017-01-Stroeve-Arctic

The Changing Arctic.

Prof. Julienne Stroeve participated in two international Arctic events during January, ArcticBaseCamp, a side meeting held in Davos, Switzerland during the World Economic Forum (WEF), and the Annual Arctic Frontiers meeting in Tromso, Norway. Both meetings brought together scientists, policy makers and industry to discuss the changing Arctic. At ArcticBaseCamp in Davos, a team of Arctic scientists presented state-of-the-art Arctic research to the world’s most powerful leaders. Prof. Julienne Stroeve from UCL delivered a keynote on the fate of Arctic sea ice. This talk was followed by presentations from former US vice president Al Gore and Christiana Figueres, the former Executive Secretary the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The event was well attended by media and foreign leaders and plans are being made to include the event at next years WEF. More...

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Deep-Water Research

The Ainsa Deepwater Channel Project, Spanish Pyrenees


An Integrated Outcrop Study: Project Manager: Professor Kevin T. Pickering


Introduction to the Ainsa Channel System


The Ainsa Channel System, south-central Pyrenees, occurs in the oldest part of the Campodarbe Group, and it is of Upper Eocene age. The Ainsa Channel Complex is per- haps the most famous of the submarine channel outcrops within Western Europe. The Ainsa channels consist of two principal channel complexes (Ainsa I and Ainsa II) which are separated by thin- and very thin-bedded sandy turbidites and marls. The Ainsa I Channel Complex is an example of an erosional-depositional system. The Ainsa II Chan- nel Complex contains significant erosional cut-downs, with infill of essentially non- erosive sandy facies. The channel dimensions are at a seismic scale.