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Dynamic Hazard Map of the Campi Flegrei Caldera.

Congratulations to Danielle Charlton, our PhD student (UCL Hazard Centre), who has won first prize for her dynamic hazard map of the Campi Flegrei caldera at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the North American Cartographic Information Society (NACIS).


Oxygen Levels were Key to Early Animal Evolution.

A recently graduated doctoral student from our department has just published strong evidence that oxygen levels were key to early animal evolution. Dr Rosalie Tostevin (now at Oxford University) was supervised by Professor Graham Shields-Zhou in a project studying some of the world’s oldest animal-based reef ecosystems in Namibia. Over the course of her PhD, she looked at various chemical tracers of oxygen, before settling on a unique combination of iron speciation, rare earth elements and sulphur isotopes. The study has been widely reported as the first one that is able to distinguish between bodies of water with low and high levels of oxygen (not simply distinguishing oxic from anoxic waters).  Rosalie shows in her work, published in Nature Communications, that poorly oxygenated waters did not support the complex life that evolved immediately prior to the Cambrian Period, suggesting the presence of oxygen was a key factor in their appearance. More...

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Deep-Water Research

The Ainsa Deepwater Channel Project, Spanish Pyrenees

An Integrated Outcrop Study: Project Manager: Professor Kevin T. Pickering

Introduction to the Ainsa Channel System

The Ainsa Channel System, south-central Pyrenees, occurs in the oldest part of the Campodarbe Group, and it is of Upper Eocene age. The Ainsa Channel Complex is per- haps the most famous of the submarine channel outcrops within Western Europe. The Ainsa channels consist of two principal channel complexes (Ainsa I and Ainsa II) which are separated by thin- and very thin-bedded sandy turbidites and marls. The Ainsa I Channel Complex is an example of an erosional-depositional system. The Ainsa II Chan- nel Complex contains significant erosional cut-downs, with infill of essentially non- erosive sandy facies. The channel dimensions are at a seismic scale.