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2014-08-Shields

Oxygen burrowed away

Multicellular animals probably evolved at the seafloor after a rise in oceanic oxygen levels. In 2013, Graham Shields-Zhou and his Chinese colleague Maoyan Zhu proposed that when these animals began to rework (bioturbate) the seafloor for the first time close to the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary, they triggered a negative feedback that reduced and stabilised global atmospheric and ocean oxygen levels.  More...

Senior Promotions

Senior Promotions

Warmest congratulations to Paul Upchurch and Ian Wood on their promotions to Professor of Palaeobiology & Professor of Crystallography respectively. We also would like to congratulate Dr  Pieter Vermeesch on his promotion to Reader in Geochronology. More...

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Deep-Water Research

The Ainsa Deepwater Channel Project, Spanish Pyrenees


An Integrated Outcrop Study: Project Manager: Professor Kevin T. Pickering


Introduction to the Ainsa Channel System


The Ainsa Channel System, south-central Pyrenees, occurs in the oldest part of the Campodarbe Group, and it is of Upper Eocene age. The Ainsa Channel Complex is per- haps the most famous of the submarine channel outcrops within Western Europe. The Ainsa channels consist of two principal channel complexes (Ainsa I and Ainsa II) which are separated by thin- and very thin-bedded sandy turbidites and marls. The Ainsa I Channel Complex is an example of an erosional-depositional system. The Ainsa II Chan- nel Complex contains significant erosional cut-downs, with infill of essentially non- erosive sandy facies. The channel dimensions are at a seismic scale.