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new-fossil

Reef built by animals 550 million years ago discovered.

The animals – called Cloudina – were the first in the world to have a hard shell and are believed to have built the reefs to protect themselves from predators, or to get a competitive advantage in acquiring food or living space. More...

Ron Cohen Award

Prof Ron Cohen receives international award

Prof Cohen received the International Award of Ferroelectric Materials and Their Applications of 2014 in Kyoto, Japan at the 31st meeting on Ferroelectric Materials and Their Applications (FMA) “For contribution to the progress in knowledge of ferroelectric materials through first principles research”.Prof. Cohen has worked on ferroelectrics since the 1980’s, his 1992 cover article in Nature being critical work on why some perovskites are ferroelectric. During his trip Prof. Cohen presented at seminars and spoke with students at the University of Tokyo and at Waseda University, and met with scientists from Kyoto University. More...

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Deep-Water Research

The Ainsa Deepwater Channel Project, Spanish Pyrenees


An Integrated Outcrop Study: Project Manager: Professor Kevin T. Pickering


Introduction to the Ainsa Channel System


The Ainsa Channel System, south-central Pyrenees, occurs in the oldest part of the Campodarbe Group, and it is of Upper Eocene age. The Ainsa Channel Complex is per- haps the most famous of the submarine channel outcrops within Western Europe. The Ainsa channels consist of two principal channel complexes (Ainsa I and Ainsa II) which are separated by thin- and very thin-bedded sandy turbidites and marls. The Ainsa I Channel Complex is an example of an erosional-depositional system. The Ainsa II Chan- nel Complex contains significant erosional cut-downs, with infill of essentially non- erosive sandy facies. The channel dimensions are at a seismic scale.