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Blaven Mountain

Impact Ejecta Layer At The Base Of Lavas On Skye Contains Unmelted Impactor Fragments.

In a collaboration between five institutions led by the UCL-Birkbeck Institute of Earth and Planetary Sciences*, geologists have discovered a 0.9-metre thick ejecta layer at the base of the Mid-Paleocene lava series, overlying Mesozoic sedimentary rocks at two localities on the Isle of Skye. The layer contains shocked minerals, metals, glasses and a variety of shocked rocks including basement gneiss, with lapilli and glass shards sharing several textural similarities with volcanic ignimbrites.
Metallic iron forms spherules with ferro-silicate glass, and irregular native iron grains with oxidized rims and barringerite (Fe,Ni2P). Rare carbo-nitrides and nitride minerals like osbornite with vanadium (TiVN) are interpreted as unmelted impactor remnants.
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Dr. Wendy Kirk 


CIPS

Mars In The Classroom


Mars in the Classroom provides an exciting program of hands-on and thought-provoking science activities for children aged 13 to 16. 

"Mars is there, waiting to be reached."

Mars, the`red planet', shines with almost a blood red colour in the night sky

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Mars In The Classroom


  • The project is themed around the students planning their own manned mission to Mars, and comprises a series of modules to be carried out in small groups.
  • The experiments within each module of Mars in the Classroom can be used either as stand-alone projects or in combination with any or all of the other modules provided. In this way, the educator has complete control over the duration and level of the program undertaken.
  • The aim of the project is to provide a stimulating program that can compliment the National Curriculum, introducing students (and educators!) to the excitement of planetary science.