Library and Information Studies - Making an Application

Information packs are available from the Department, and include an application form. Alternatively, applications may be made online.

Applicants should provide two references, which will normally include an academic reference and a reference from your current employer (i.e. your line manager or similar). A transcript of results from your previous academic institution should also be included. It is usually possible to obtain confirmation of your results, even if you graduated some years ago.

Online applications will not usually be processed until they are complete i.e. the necessary documents are all uploaded.

Most candidates will apply for either full-time or part-time study. If you are not sure which you want, please mention this at interview. Because of the number of students involved it isn't possible to switch from one to the other when the course begins, but we are quite happy to consider you for both during the admissions process. This is simply a matter of managing numbers, and you don't prejudice your application by applying in this way.

Processing applications
Your application will initially be dealt with by the UCL Registry, and then passed to the Department where it will be checked. You will be told that your papers have been received, and are being processed. At this stage you may be asked to provide further information, or to clarify any ambiguities; this doesn't mean that there is a problem with the application.

Contact with applicants is usually via email, so be sure that your account details are current and correct, and that you check the account regularly. Please feel free to email us with any queries or problems you may have.

Interviews
UCL has a policy of interviewing all suitably qualified applicants, and, except in the case of overseas applicants, no-one is offered a place without interview. Candidates will be invited for interview in the early part of the Spring Term. Full-time applicants are seen first (in January and February) while part-time applicants are usually interviewed later in February, and March, depending on overall numbers.

You will normally be seen by two members of staff, and the interview, which lasts about 30 minutes, is relatively informal. You won't be expected to give a presentation, or anything of that kind. Give yourself enough time to allow for delays, and to find the Department.

Letting you know the outcome
We see everyone in each group of candidates (full-time and part-time) before making any decisions about offers of places, and will tell you at the interview when you are likely to hear. Because UCL is a popular university we usually have more applicants than places, and unfortunately even well qualified candidates may be disappointed. We seldom turn anyone down because there is 'something wrong' with the application, but usually simply because there is too large a number of good potential students. We take into account a combination of academic achievement, work experience, and performance at interview, with none of these being more important than the others.

At present there is more demand for part-time than for full-time places.

Successful candidates will be sent further information during the course of the summer, and you should also watch the Departmental website.

Funding
UCL has a small number of scholarships (details on the Graduate School website) but these are likely only to be awarded to students of exceptional academic ability. For 2014 entry, the Department has fourteen Vickery Bursaries, worth £3,000 pounds each, for students on the MA LIS programme; these will be awarded at the discretion of the Department. The MA LIS programme also receives support from the Worshipful Company of Stationers in the form of a dedicated bursary in their postgraduate education scheme.  Further details can be found on the Stationers’ website at http://www.stationers.org/postgraduate-bursary-scheme.html.

Most students are self-financing, relying on savings or career development loans. Part-time work (in libraries and elsewhere) is fairly readily available in London, and most full-time students can find something that fits in with the course.

Page last modified on 25 nov 13 11:57