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Translation and Transliteration of Contact Information initial report open to public comment

Wed, 17 Dec 2014 11:54:59 +0000

For the last year I’ve been co-chairing an ICANN working group on Translation and Transliteration of Contact Information, an issue which will arise once the current ASCII-based Whois directory of domain name contacts is replaced by a system allowing domain name holders to input data in their own languages and scripts. Yesterday was the big […]

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The UCL Laptop Orchestra (UCLOrk)

Mon, 17 Nov 2014 09:16:14 +0000

At the UCL DigiFest 2014 (ucldigifest.org), the Music Systems Engineering Research Team led by Dr Nicolas Gold (UCL Computer Science/UCLDH) ran a 1.5hr session for people interested in digital music.  Participants learned about building digital instruments using the Pure Data programming language, explored the sonic possibilities of synthesised sounds, and then came together as a […]

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Digitising the (manu)Script Worlds of Ancient Egypt

Publication date: Feb 19, 2013 04:52 PM

Start: Mar 20, 2013 12:00 PM
End: Mar 20, 2013 01:00 PM

Location: Petrie Museum

Painless Introductions series icon

Please note that registration is required as places for this event are limited: http://www.eventbrite.com/event/5574872594

As part of the UCLDH Painless Introduction series, Stephen Quirke and Tim Weyrich present the material and digital dimensions of one of UCL's hidden treasures: several thousand fragments of ancient Egyptian papyri from about 1800 BC, discovered across a town-site near al-Lahun in 1889 by an excavation team led by Flinders Petrie.

Preserved today at the Petrie Museum, UCL, they are famous in Egyptology as the most ancient snapshot of writing in a town, including mathematical, medical, literary and ritual manuscripts as well as personal letters and accounts.

Our speakers will give an overview of the conservation history of the papyri, explaining traditional approaches to Egyptian manuscript preservation and study, focussed on the recording of similarity and difference across the collection. The potential of traditional, manual methods, although ably exploited in the past, leaves ample room for complementary contributions by new technologies. 

Recent work has produced advances in handwriting research and study of the papyri, and opened up new opportunities for structural analysis of both the medium and the script, previously uncommon in Egyptology. A demonstration of a newly developed scanning procedure to obtain high-quality reproduction of the papyrus material structure will also be given. 

Stephen Quirke is Professor in Egyptology at the Institute of Archaeology and Curator at the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology; Tim Weyrich is Senior Lecturer in the Virtual Environments and Computer Graphics group at the UCL Department of Computer Science and Associate Director of the UCL Centre for Digital Humanities. 

Page last modified on 19 feb 13 16:04 by Sarah Davenport