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UCLDH Blog

We turn five!

Mon, 23 Mar 2015 13:37:08 +0000

Five years ago, we were in the final run up to the official launch of UCL Centre for Digital Humanities, at an event that happened in May 2010. And such a lot has happened since then! We’ve worked on a range of projects, from helping sort out linguistic issues with domain names and how best […]

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PanoptiCam launched

Mon, 23 Mar 2015 11:56:14 +0000

  PanoptiCam is a new project running a surveillance camera on Jeremy Bentham’s cabinet in the university’s South Cloisters: Seeing Jeremy Bentham’s auto-icon can evoke a wide array of emotions from surprise and shock to mirth. PanoptiCam captures people’s reaction using a webcam mounted above the auto-icon, with the camera feed posted to our website […]

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Digitising the (manu)Script Worlds of Ancient Egypt

Publication date: Feb 19, 2013 04:52 PM

Start: Mar 20, 2013 12:00 PM
End: Mar 20, 2013 01:00 PM

Location: Petrie Museum

Painless Introductions series icon

Please note that registration is required as places for this event are limited: http://www.eventbrite.com/event/5574872594

As part of the UCLDH Painless Introduction series, Stephen Quirke and Tim Weyrich present the material and digital dimensions of one of UCL's hidden treasures: several thousand fragments of ancient Egyptian papyri from about 1800 BC, discovered across a town-site near al-Lahun in 1889 by an excavation team led by Flinders Petrie.

Preserved today at the Petrie Museum, UCL, they are famous in Egyptology as the most ancient snapshot of writing in a town, including mathematical, medical, literary and ritual manuscripts as well as personal letters and accounts.

Our speakers will give an overview of the conservation history of the papyri, explaining traditional approaches to Egyptian manuscript preservation and study, focussed on the recording of similarity and difference across the collection. The potential of traditional, manual methods, although ably exploited in the past, leaves ample room for complementary contributions by new technologies. 

Recent work has produced advances in handwriting research and study of the papyri, and opened up new opportunities for structural analysis of both the medium and the script, previously uncommon in Egyptology. A demonstration of a newly developed scanning procedure to obtain high-quality reproduction of the papyrus material structure will also be given. 

Stephen Quirke is Professor in Egyptology at the Institute of Archaeology and Curator at the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology; Tim Weyrich is Senior Lecturer in the Virtual Environments and Computer Graphics group at the UCL Department of Computer Science and Associate Director of the UCL Centre for Digital Humanities. 

Page last modified on 19 feb 13 16:04 by Sarah Davenport