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UCLDH Blog

We turn five!

Mon, 23 Mar 2015 13:37:08 +0000

Five years ago, we were in the final run up to the official launch of UCL Centre for Digital Humanities, at an event that happened in May 2010. And such a lot has happened since then! We’ve worked on a range of projects, from helping sort out linguistic issues with domain names and how best […]

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PanoptiCam launched

Mon, 23 Mar 2015 11:56:14 +0000

  PanoptiCam is a new project running a surveillance camera on Jeremy Bentham’s cabinet in the university’s South Cloisters: Seeing Jeremy Bentham’s auto-icon can evoke a wide array of emotions from surprise and shock to mirth. PanoptiCam captures people’s reaction using a webcam mounted above the auto-icon, with the camera feed posted to our website […]

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Think-aloud studies of information behaviour

Publication date: Jan 28, 2013 03:20 PM

Start: Feb 05, 2013 01:00 PM
End: Feb 05, 2013 02:00 PM

Location: G31, Foster Court

Painless Introductions series icon


In this Painless Introduction, Stephann Makri will discuss how to plan and conduct think-aloud observations of digital information behaviour. This will be an interactive and discursive Painless Introduction where you will be directly involved in planning a study aimed at looking at how information is acquired, interpreted and used.

After the planning is done, an audience member will be invited to participate in the study and we will discuss how digital information environments can be designed to better support their digital information behaviour.

Stephann Makri is a Research Associate at UCL Interaction Centre. His research looks at how people acquire, interpret and use information in the context of their work and how this understanding can be fed into the user-centred design and evaluation of digital information environments. Stephann is currently working on a £1.82m UK Research Council funded project called SerenA: Chance Encounters in the Space of Ideas, which has involved gaining a rich understanding of peoples' examples of serendipity (including coming across information serendipitously) and using this understanding to inform the design of digital information environments aimed at creating opportunities for 'happy accidents.'

Page last modified on 28 jan 13 15:02 by Sarah Davenport