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Digital Classicist seminar

Mon, 11 Aug 2014 10:37:20 +0000

For our final seminar of this series we have four students from King’s and UCL presenting their current research (including one from the current UCLDH cohort). Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2014 Friday August 15th in room G37, Senate House, Malet Street, WC1E 7HU Wilma Stefani (Masters, King’s College London) ‘Online […]

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Tue, 29 Jul 2014 07:37:03 +0000

Details of this week’s Digital Classicist seminar: Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2014 Sebastian Rahtz (Oxford) & Gabriel Bodard (King’s College London) Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopographies: Data and Relations in Greco-Roman Names (SNAP:DRGN) Friday August 1st in room G37, Senate House, Malet Street, WC1E 7HU SNAP:DRGN (snapdrgn.net) is an AHRC-funded […]

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"The area told as a story. An inquiry into the relationship between verbal and map-based expressions of geographical information"

Publication date: May 7, 2013 4:57:12 PM

Start: May 16, 2013 5:30:00 PM
End: May 16, 2013 6:30:00 PM

Location: G31, Foster Court

A talk by Oyvind Eide, Unit for Digital Documentation, University of Oslo.

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Abstract: 

"In the struggle every creator of expressions goes through, the restrictions of the media being used are there, to be obeyed or to be questioned. In this paper I will show how maps and verbal texts are different media, and how these differences have consequences not only for how things are said, but also for what can be said at all using these two media. 

I will present a series of modelling experiments in which this is studied in detail. Based on the results from these experiments, an inventory of types of information that are incompatible will be presented. 

Further, it will be shown how the findings from the experiments are in line with traditional as well as recent views in the area of interart and intermedia studies, which indicates that they may be applicable to most if not all texts. 

The paper will be concluded by a discussion of how the understanding of these differences may be brought forward by future research."

All welcome.

Page last modified on 07 may 13 16:18 by Sarah Davenport