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Seminar: Digital technologies and the Herculaneum Papyri

Tue, 11 Aug 2015 09:14:24 +0000

This week sees the final seminar in this Summer’s series. Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2015 Friday August 15 at 16:30 in room G21A, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU Sarah Hendriks (CISPE: Centro Internazionale Studio dei Papiri Ercolanesi, Naples): ‘Digital technologies and the Herculaneum Papyri’ The technology available today […]

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Seminar: Graecum-Arabicum-Latinum Encoded Corpus (GALEN©)

Tue, 04 Aug 2015 11:14:52 +0000

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2015 Friday August 7 at 16:30 in room G21A, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU Usama Gad (Heidelberg): ‘Graecum-Arabicum-Latinum Encoded Corpus (GALEN©)’   GALEN is a long-term project to produce the first comprehensive digital corpus of translations between Greek, Arabic and Latin. The project seeks […]

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"The area told as a story. An inquiry into the relationship between verbal and map-based expressions of geographical information"

Publication date: May 07, 2013 04:57 PM

Start: May 16, 2013 05:30 PM
End: May 16, 2013 06:30 PM

Location: G31, Foster Court

A talk by Oyvind Eide, Unit for Digital Documentation, University of Oslo.

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Abstract: 

"In the struggle every creator of expressions goes through, the restrictions of the media being used are there, to be obeyed or to be questioned. In this paper I will show how maps and verbal texts are different media, and how these differences have consequences not only for how things are said, but also for what can be said at all using these two media. 

I will present a series of modelling experiments in which this is studied in detail. Based on the results from these experiments, an inventory of types of information that are incompatible will be presented. 

Further, it will be shown how the findings from the experiments are in line with traditional as well as recent views in the area of interart and intermedia studies, which indicates that they may be applicable to most if not all texts. 

The paper will be concluded by a discussion of how the understanding of these differences may be brought forward by future research."

All welcome.

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