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Translation and Transliteration of Contact Information initial report open to public comment

Wed, 17 Dec 2014 11:54:59 +0000

For the last year I’ve been co-chairing an ICANN working group on Translation and Transliteration of Contact Information, an issue which will arise once the current ASCII-based Whois directory of domain name contacts is replaced by a system allowing domain name holders to input data in their own languages and scripts. Yesterday was the big […]

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The UCL Laptop Orchestra (UCLOrk)

Mon, 17 Nov 2014 09:16:14 +0000

At the UCL DigiFest 2014 (ucldigifest.org), the Music Systems Engineering Research Team led by Dr Nicolas Gold (UCL Computer Science/UCLDH) ran a 1.5hr session for people interested in digital music.  Participants learned about building digital instruments using the Pure Data programming language, explored the sonic possibilities of synthesised sounds, and then came together as a […]

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"The area told as a story. An inquiry into the relationship between verbal and map-based expressions of geographical information"

Publication date: May 07, 2013 04:57 PM

Start: May 16, 2013 05:30 PM
End: May 16, 2013 06:30 PM

Location: G31, Foster Court

A talk by Oyvind Eide, Unit for Digital Documentation, University of Oslo.

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Abstract: 

"In the struggle every creator of expressions goes through, the restrictions of the media being used are there, to be obeyed or to be questioned. In this paper I will show how maps and verbal texts are different media, and how these differences have consequences not only for how things are said, but also for what can be said at all using these two media. 

I will present a series of modelling experiments in which this is studied in detail. Based on the results from these experiments, an inventory of types of information that are incompatible will be presented. 

Further, it will be shown how the findings from the experiments are in line with traditional as well as recent views in the area of interart and intermedia studies, which indicates that they may be applicable to most if not all texts. 

The paper will be concluded by a discussion of how the understanding of these differences may be brought forward by future research."

All welcome.

Page last modified on 07 may 13 16:18 by Sarah Davenport