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Visit to the Institute of Making

Tue, 01 Apr 2014 10:14:53 +0000

We are very lucky to have an Institute of Making at UCL. I often walk past its impressive glass front, peer at the collection of things on shelves that can be seen inside, and wonder what on earth they are and what goes on in there. So I was delighted when a group of us [...]

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New Project – MiCLUES

Mon, 10 Mar 2014 16:52:29 +0000

We recently started a project called MiCLUES to develop dynamic smartphone-based visitor guidance algorithms and software for the Royal College of Music Museum of Instruments.  The aim is to enable visitors to make better use of the combined physical and digital collections and to chart both curated and personalised paths through the museum. The project [...]

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Geographia, Chorographia, and the Prehistory of Modern Geography: Unravelling the Geographike Hyphegesis of Claudius Ptolemy 

Publication date: Mar 13, 2013 4:22:41 PM

Start: May 20, 2013 5:30:00 PM

Location: G31, Foster Court

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Dr Leif Isaksen, University of Southampton

This paper will argue that Ptolemy’s Geographike Hyphegesis ('Manual for world-drawing') is a unique fusion of pre-Ptolemaic sources that far surpasses its precursors. It makes the case that the work’s purpose is to provide a terrestrial counterpart to the data compiled in his earlier and equally significant astronomical treatise, the Mathematical Syntaxis. This is expressly to derive local celestial phenomena for a given time in order to draw a wide range of astrological, meteorological, environmental and anthropological conclusions.

A variety of digital methods, including toponymic comparisons, and linear interpolation, will be used to expose the ways in which this combination of fragmentary source material has left traces within the structure of the enormous place catalogue that indicate the nature of both geographic and chorographic sources. Exploring these spatial and categorical ‘fractures’ opens up new possibilities for appraising a crucial stage in the development of geographic thought.

Leif Isaksen is Deputy Director of the Web Science Doctoral Training Centre at the University of Southampton. He is researching the impact that rapidly changing social and technical connectivity is having on heritage discourse, both within and beyond academia, and has a strong interest in the development of geographic thought and representation in Antiquity, and especially in the work of Claudius Ptolemy and the Roman itinerary tradition.

A drinks reception will follow, all welcome.

Page last modified on 13 mar 13 16:13 by Sarah Davenport