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Latest Brain Sciences News

National Student Survey: improvement in student satisfaction

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Students at UCL

Student satisfaction at UCL has risen by 2%, according to the latest National Student Survey (NSS) results.

Equation to predict happiness

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happy kids

The happiness of over 18,000 people worldwide has been predicted by a mathematical equation developed by researchers at UCL, with results showing that moment-to-moment happiness reflects not just how well things are going, but whether things are going better than expected.

Mobile games used for psychology experiments

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Psychology_app2

Initial findings from one of the largest cognitive science experiments ever conducted have shown that mobile games can be used to reliably address psychology questions, paving the way to a better understanding of how cognitive function differs across populations.

Climate scientists need professional body, says UCL policy commission

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Time for Change Report

Climate scientists need to establish a professional body to help define their roles, values and practices to satisfy society’s needs, and to provide guidance to improve their training and development, according to a report published today by the UCL Policy Commission on the Communication of Climate Science. 

Queen’s Birthday Honours for the UCL community

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David Fish

A number of people from the UCL community have been recognised in the Queen’s Birthday Honours list.

Immune system implicated in dementia development

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Frontotemporal Dementia map

The immune system and body’s response to damaged cells play a key role in the development of frontotemporal dementia (FTD), finds new UCL-led research.

‘Map of pain’ reveals how our ability to identify the source of pain varies across the body

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Demonstration of spatial acuity test

“Where does it hurt?” is the first question asked to any person in pain.

A new UCL study defines for the first time how our ability to identify where it hurts, called “spatial acuity”, varies across the body, being most sensitive at the forehead and fingertips.

New Dean for UCL Faculty of Life Sciences

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Geraint Rees, Director of the UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience has been appointed to the next Dean of the Faculty of Life Sciences, with effect from 1 September 2014.

UCL professor wins Kavli Prize in Neuroscience

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Professor John O'Keefe

The 2014 Kavli Prize in Neuroscience was today awarded to Professor John O’Keefe, Director of the Sainsbury Wellcome Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour at UCL and affiliated faculty member in the UCL Research Department of Cell and Developmental Biology.

New epilepsy treatment offers ‘on demand’ seizure suppression

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The new technique could see people with epilepsy taking pills to control seizures

A new treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy with the potential to suppress seizures ‘on demand’ with a pill, similar to how you might take painkillers when you feel a headache coming on, has been developed by UCL researchers funded by the Wellcome Trust.

UCL commits to openness about animal research

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A research animal at UCL

UCL formally committed today to a policy of openness about animal research when Professor Michael Arthur (UCL President & Provost) signed the Concordat on Openness on Animal Research in the UK.

Watch out: children more prone to looking but not seeing

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London bus featuring 'T-side' advertisement

Children under 14 are more likely than adults to be ‘blinded’ to their surroundings when focusing on simple things, finds a new UCL study.

UCL and Max Planck Society invest €5m to open world’s first computational psychiatry centre

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Professor Peter Gruss, President of the Max Planck Society

The world’s first centre for computational psychiatry was launched on Tuesday 1st April, following a €5m investment from the Max Planck Society and UCL to be spent over the next 5 years.

Cell-saving drugs could reduce brain damage after stroke

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Capillaries showing pericytes in purple

Long-term brain damage caused by stroke could be reduced by saving cells called pericytes that control blood flow in capillaries, reports a new UCL-led study.

Information overload acts ‘to dim the lights’ on what we see

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300sq RAF Pilot Training in Cockpit of Nimrod Aircraft

Too much visual information causes a phenomenon known as ‘load induced blindness’, with an effect akin to dimming the lights, reports a new UCL study.

UCL researchers set to take their research to parliament

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SET for Britain group

Sixteen researchers from around UCL have been shortlisted to present their research to a panel of expert judges and over 100 MPs in this year’s SET for Britain competition.

Invisible light bursts are keeping animals away from power lines

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Reindeer

Animals may avoid high voltage power cables because of flashing UV light that is undetectable to humans, scientists say.

New innovation could mean eye injections are a thing of the past

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Human Eye

Drugs used to treat blindness-causing disorders could be successfully administered by eye drops rather than unpleasant and expensive eye injections, according to new research led by UCL scientists that could be a breakthrough for the millions worldwide suffering from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other eye disorders.

New partnership between UCLP brain tumour scientists and Brain Tumour Research

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We are delighted to announce a ground-breaking new research partnership between Queen Mary University of London and UCL Institute of Neurology (under UCLPartners) and the charity Brain Tumour Research. The partnership begins a new chapter in long-term, sustainable and continuous research into brain tumours, the biggest cancer killer of children and adults under 40.

£10 million funding for pioneering brain tumour research programmes

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The Samantha Dickson Brain Cancer Unit at the UCL Cancer Institute is one of three pioneering research programmes to benefit from an unprecedented £10 million in funding. Grants from The Brain Tumour Charity totalling £5million will fund the research programmes and are being matched by other charitable and public sources. The milestone investment paves the way to transform the diagnosis and treatment of both childhood and adult brain tumours, the biggest cancer killer of people under 40.

Mathematical beauty activates same brain region as great art or music

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Beautiful formula

People who appreciate the beauty of mathematics activate the same part of their brain when they look at aesthetically pleasing formula as others do when appreciating art or music, suggesting that there is a neurobiological basis to beauty.

€3.5m to improve diagnosis of balance disorders

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Quad UCLH (square)

GPs and other doctors will be equipped with a new, online information system to help diagnose and treat a range of balance disorders, thanks to €3.5m European Union funding for EMBalance.

Vibrations influence the circadian clock of a fruit fly

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Circadian clock

The internal circadian clock of a Drosophila (fruit fly) can be synchronised using vibrations, according to research published today in the journalScience. The study suggests that an animal’s own movements can influence its clock.

UCL PhD student rewarded for interactive science talks

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Isabel Christie

PhD student Isabel Christie (UCL Centre for Advanced Biomedical Imaging) has received an award for her interactive talk, Becoming a Neuroscientist.

Research Images as Art/Art Images as Research: winners announced

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Muscle Fibres of the Heart

A striking image showing the spiral structure of heart muscle fibres in minute detail is the overall winner of this year’s Research Images as Art/Art Images as Research competition, run by the UCL Graduate School.

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