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Astrobiology and Planetary Exploration (APEX) Meetings

The APEX series of meetings is held on Thursdays at 1pm in the Garwood Lecture Theatre, located on the 1st Floor of the South Wing, UCL: APEX programme

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Professor Andrew Fazakerly presents Professor Michael Arthur with a picture taken by the PanCam engineering model

PanCam takes picture of UCL's Provost

UCL President & Provost Professor Michael Arthur visited MSSL today (6 July 2018), with Dean of Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MAPS) Professor Ivan Parkin and Faculty Manager Donna Williamson. More...

Cassini and Saturn's Magnetosphere. Credit: ESA

Magnetic field collisions around Saturn reveal planetary differences

Magnetic reconnection – the explosive reconfiguration of two magnetic fields – occurs differently around Saturn than around Earth, according to new findings from the international Cassini mission involving UCL researchers. More...

ARIEL

ARIEL selected as ESA’s next medium-class science mission

Giovanna Tinetti, a member of the Centre for Planetary Sciences at UCL/Birkbeck, and her team at UCL are leading a multi-million pound European mission to study newly discovered planets after it was selected today as the next European Space Agency science mission. More...

Dr Ingo Waldmann

ERC Starting Grant awarded to Dr Ingo Waldmann

Many congratulations to Dr Ingo Waldmann (Physics & Astronomy, UCL) who has recently been awarded a €1.5M European Research Council (ERC) Starting Grant for a project entitled: ExoAI - Deciphering super-Earths using artificial intelligence. The project will run for 5 years, starting in January 2018. More...

Jupiter’s south pole, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles (52,000 kilometers) (credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles)

Jupiter's X-Ray auroras pulse independently

Jupiter’s intense northern and southern lights pulse independently of each other according to new UCL-led research using ESA’s XMM-Newton and NASA’s Chandra X-ray observatories. More...

This illustration of the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn depicts the planet’s enormous magnetic field and the bow shock created as the solar wind runs into it. The cusps can be seen as the funnel-shaped regions that reach down to the planet’s poles. Credit: ESA

Probing the Cusps of Saturn's Magnetic Field

Data from the Cassini spacecraft show that the cusp regions of Saturn’s magnetic field—where it connects to the Sun’s magnetic field—have similarities to Earth’s and also intriguing differences. More...

Hot Jupiter exoplanets

Size matters in the detection of exoplanet atmospheres

A group-analysis of 30 exoplanets orbiting distant stars suggests that size, not mass, is a key factor in whether a planet’s atmosphere can be detected according to a UCL-led team of European researchers. More...

Artist’s impression of Cassini in orbit at Saturn

Cassini’s legacy and a final farewell

Many researchers at the UCL/Birkbeck Centre for Planetary Sciences said a fond farewell to the Cassini spacecraft when it was plunged into Saturn on 15 September 2017, after 13 years of exploring the giant planet and its moons, leaving an enormous legacy of data. More...

John Guest

Guest crater on the Moon

A crater on the Moon has been named after the late John Guest (1938-2012), a pioneer in volcanology and planetary science, who inspired generations of colleagues and students at UCL for over half a century. During his time at UCL, John established the emerging disciplines of planetary geology and physical volcanology and, in 1980, he founded the first NASA Regional Planetary Image Facility outside the USA.  More...

The International Journal of Astrobiology

The intellectual and social benefits of astrobiology

In a new article soon to be published by the International Journal of Astrobiology, Professor Ian Crawford aims to explain the broader aims of astrobiology:  More...

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Page last modified on 04 feb 15 14:57 by Joanna Fabbri