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Robert Hazell gives evidence to Liaison Committee on public appointments

16 June 2011

Whitehall

Robert Hazell today appeared before the House of Commons Liaison Committee as expert witnesses on the issue of parliamentary involvement in key public appointments.

In February 2010, the Unit published a report that evaluating the scrutiny processes undertaken for top appointments which fed into the Liaison Committee's first report.


The Liaison Committee comprises the chairs of all the major Commons select committees. Following the Unit's report, it launched a short inquiry on Parliament's role in key public appointments, which included today's evidence session with Prof Hazell, and a hearing with Cabinet Office minister Francis Maude MP.

The committee is expected to publish a report with recommendations for reform to the current system.

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